Coconut Chia Seed Pudding With Savory Granola And Tropical Fruit

coconut chia seed pudding

 

coconut chia seed pudding

Chia seed pudding has become as popular to eat for breakfast as yogurt parfaits these days. Like yogurt, the simple base for this pudding is very versatile and can be flavored and topped with almost anything.

Living in Hawaii I’m partial to topping it with tropical fruit myself but you could also use fresh berries, diced stone fruit, apples, pears and pomegranate seeds. Really any kind of fruit you can think of.

This is a handy go-to breakfast for a few reasons: 

  1. It’s fast. You make it the evening before so it is ready to eat the next morning. All you have to do is sprinkle on your toppings and grab a spoon.
  2. It’s easy to make. The pudding literally takes 1-2 minutes to put together. You don’t have to make your own granola like I do, store bought is fine and much simpler. If you use fruit like frozen berries there is not even any fruit prep to do.
  3. The ingredients are non-perishable. Keep some cans of coconut milk and toppings like granola and cacao nibs in the cupboard so you have them whenever you need them. If you store toppings like nuts, seeds and shredded coconut in the refrigerator they will stay fresh for months. You can even keep frozen berries on hand in the freezer .You never have to run the risk of any of the ingredients for this dish going bad before you get to them
chia seed pudding
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Coconut Chia Seed Pudding With Savory Granola And Tropical Fruit

This is a very basic coconut chia seed pudding recipe. You do not have to use the suggested toppings to garnish it with. You can use any fruit or toppings you desire or even just eat it plain. The tropical fruit I used in the photo shown was lilikoi, red dragonfruit and papaya from Hawaii.

Course Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine Dairy free, Gluten free
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 14 fl oz Coconut Milk 1 can, unsweetened
  • 1 Tbsp Pure Vanilla Extract
  • 1/4 tsp Sea Salt
  • 2 Tbsp Raw Honey
  • 5 Tbsp Chia Seeds

Garnishes:

  • 1/2 cup Savory Granola store bought or see link below to make your own
  • 1 Tbsp Cacao Nibs
  • 2 Tbsp Shredded Coconut
  • 2 tsp Hemp Seeds
  • 1/2 cup Tropical fruit diced

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl whisk together the coconut milk, vanilla extract, sea salt and honey. Whisk the chia seeds in last. 

  2. Ladle the pudding into 4 ramekins or coffee cups, cover them with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. 

  3. The next day, unwrap your puddings right before serving and garnish each one with granola, cacao nibs, shredded coconut and tropical fruit. 

  4. Chia puddings (without garnishes) will stay fresh in the refrigerator up to 5 days. 

Recipe Notes

I recommend using Organic Aroy-D coconut milk for this recipe. It comes out nice and creamy and thick. Other coconut milks may result in a thinner pudding. 

The recipe for my savory granola is right here.

Need shredded coconut? - Use this

Need cacao nibs? - Use this

Need hemp seeds? - Use this

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Cold Asian Noodle Salad

Cold Asian Noodle Salad
Cold Asian Noodle Salad
Photo by Ketino Photography

There is nothing more satisfying on a hot night than a grilled piece of meat and a cold Asian noodle salad. There is something about the smokiness of the meat that pairs perfectly with the vinegar and the cold crunchy vegetables in this salad.

This salad can be made ahead of time to eat all throughout the week. It is perfect for picnics and a great meal to take with you to work for lunch.

Too busy to prep all of these veggies? Do your knife skills sorta suck? Many grocery stores now sell vegetables pre-sliced in the produce section. Using these will cut your prep time on this dish way down and take some of the stress out of getting dinner on the table.

Cold Asian Noodle Salad
Photo by Ketino Photography
Cold Asian Noodle Salad
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Cold Asian Noodle Salad

* Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

Servings 2 Servings

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces Rice noodles
  • 3 sprigs Cilantro whole leaves
  • 3 sprigs Mint whole leaves
  • 3 sprigs Basil whole leaves
  • 1 each Scallion sliced thin
  • 2 inches English cucumber sliced into half moons
  • 1 each Radish sliced thin
  • 1/4 cup Carrot julienned
  • 1/2 cup Red bell pepper julienned
  • 10 each Snap peas julienned
  • 1 Tbsp Sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp Rice vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp Bragg Liquid Aminos
  • TT Sea salt and black pepper

Instructions

  1. Follow the cooking directions on the package of rice noodles. After they are cooked, rinse well under cold water and strain. 

  2. Toss the cooked, cold noodles with the rest of the ingredients and serve. 

Recipe Notes

Need Sesame oil? - Buy it here

Need Rice vinegar? - Buy it here

Need Bragg Liquid Aminos? - Buy it here

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Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Vegetable Frittata

tortilla espanola recipe

tortilla espanola recipe

This week I was inspired by a recipe in Food & Wine magazine for Vegetable Tortilla. A rendition on a classic Spanish tapa, Tortilla Española.

Tortilla Española is basically an omelette that is cooked with sliced potato, onion and olive oil. It’s delicious. But, here’s the thing, it is time consuming to make and there is a fair amount of finesse involved in the cooking technique.

As a chef dishes like these are fun for me to make but realistically for anyone who has a busy life and not a lot of time to cook it’s too complicated.

So, I thought to myself after making this Vegetable Tortilla, how can I make this easier and more approachable for my readers? The answer is simple. It involves taking these same ingredients but using the technique you would use to make a Frittata with instead.

A Frittata and a Tortilla Española are basically the same exact thing. They are both essentially omelets. The difference is a Tortilla Española is cooked from beginning to end on the stove flipped halfway through and a Frittata starts on the stove and gets finished in the oven. A Frittata can also consist of any type of filling you want besides egg whereas a traditional Tortilla Española only has egg, potato, onion and olive oil.

So here is my adapted version of this month’s Food & Wine Vegetable Tortilla recipe done Frittata style.

I recommend making this on the weekend and enjoying leftovers on Monday and Tuesday morning for a quick and easy breakfast.

tortilla espanola recipe
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Vegetable Frittata

You will need an oven safe, large, non-stick skillet for this recipe. *Use organic ingredients whenever possible. 

Servings 6 Servings

Ingredients

  • 1 each Yukon Gold potato sliced 1/8 inch thick (1/2 cup)
  • 2 Tbsp Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1/4 each Yellow onion sliced thin
  • 1 each Zucchini small, sliced 1/8 inch thick
  • 1/2 each Red bell pepper sliced thin (1/2 cup)
  • 1 clove Garlic minced
  • 5 sprigs Thyme stems removed and chopped
  • 1 cup Baby spinach packed
  • 6 each Eggs beaten
  • TT Salt and Pepper

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat oven 400 degrees.

  2. Place the sliced potato in a small pot, cover with cold water, add a pinch of salt and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until just tender about 5-10 minutes. Strain and set aside.

  3. In a large non-stick skillet heat the olive oil on medium-high heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and sauté for a few minutes until soft. 

  4. Add the zucchini, bell pepper and another pinch of salt and cook another 5 minutes. 

  5. Add the garlic and thyme, cook one minute more and then add the cooked potatoes and spinach. When spinach is wilted down spread all of the vegetables into an even layer and add the beaten eggs. Season with salt and pepper and pop the whole pan in the oven. 

  6. Bake about 10 minutes or until eggs are set. If you are not sure if the frittata is ready insert a toothpick into the center. If it comes out clean the frittata is ready. 

  7. Let the frittata cool for a few minutes in the pan on top of the stove off the heat. Then place a cutting board over the top of the pan and invert the frittata on to the cutting board. Slice and serve or refrigerate for later. 

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Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Simple Beet Poke

beet poke
beet poke
Photo by Ketino Photography

When I first moved to Hawaii I just about overdosed on tuna poke. It is one of my favorite dishes of all time.

Although traditionally made with fish, poke can be made with just about any ingredient you like. To give myself a break time to time, from the mercury that is found in large fish like tuna, I make poke with beets.

This simple preparation of beet poke can be used as an appetizer, side dish or healthy mid-afternoon snack and stays fresh in the fridge up to a week.

To mimic the color of local Hawaiian Bigeye tuna I use red beets. I also use traditional poke condiments like inamona –  roasted and ground kukui nuts, alaea – red Hawaiian sea salt and fresh Hawaiian chile. I have provided substitutes in the recipe below if you are unable to source these Hawaiian ingredients.

beet poke
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Simple Beet Poke

Use local organic ingredients when possible. Ground hazelnuts or macadamia nuts can be substituted for the inamona, red jalapeño or fresno chiles can be used to substitute the Hawaiian chile and grey or pink sea salt can be used instead of alaea.

Servings 2 Servings

Ingredients

  • 4 each Small Red beets washed, leaves removed
  • 2 Tablespoons Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 Tablespoon Rice Vinegar unseasoned
  • 1/2 each Red Hawaiian Chile minced
  • 1 teaspoon Inamona
  • 1 sprig Mint chopped
  • TT Alaea (Red Hawaiian Sea Salt)
  • TT Black pepper ground

Instructions

Roasted beets

  1. Pre-heat oven 350 degrees. 

  2. Toss the beets with 1 Tablespoon Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and wrap tightly in foil. Place on a pan and roast in the oven for about an hour or until tender.

    beet poke
  3. Remove from oven, unwrap the beets and allow them to cool completely. 

  4. Peel the beets and cut them into quarters. 

Beet Poke

  1. In a bowl, mix together the beets, 1 Tablespoon Extra-Virgin Olive Oil, rice vinegar, Hawaiian chile, inamona, mint, alaea and black pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings as necessary. 

  2. Serve cold or at room temperature.

Recipe Notes

Need alaea? - Buy it here

Inamona can be difficult to find if you do not live in Hawaii. If you are determined to use it, instead of using one of the substitutions suggested above, I have found one website that ships. The quantities are large but you can always keep it in your freezer and take it out as needed. Need inamona? - Buy it here

Need unsweetened rice vinegar? - Buy it here

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Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

Iced Coconut Chai Golden Milk
Iced Coconut Chai Golden Milk
Photo by: Ketino Photography

Since moving to Hawaii I crave iced drinks now more than ever. Golden milk was something I really got into right before leaving San Francisco and I’ve always been a chai tea junkie. In this recipe I took the best of both worlds combined them with thick coconut milk and threw the whole concoction over ice. Pure bliss on a hot day.

Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk
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Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

A great shortcut for this recipe is to buy an already pre-blended chai spice. I also like to use cashew milk in this recipe but almond, soy or regular cow's milk will work too. Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Cuisine Dairy free
Servings 2 cups

Ingredients

Chai Spice Infusion

  • 15 grams Cardamom seeds
  • 10 grams Star Anise whole
  • 8 grams Coriander seeds
  • 1 each Cinnamon stick
  • 5 grams Cloves whole
  • 5 grams Black Peppercorns whole
  • 1 gram Nutmeg ground
  • 1 gram Allspice whole

Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

  • 2 cups Chai Spice Infusion
  • 1/2 cup Coconut Milk unsweetened
  • 1/2 cups Cashew Milk
  • 1/2 inch Piece of ginger peeled and smashed
  • 1 inch Piece of fresh turmeric peeled and smashed
  • 1 teaspoon Raw honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt

Instructions

Chai Spice Infusion

  1. Lightly crush all spices with a mortar and pestle or with the back of a sauté pan.
  2. Place the spices and 2 1/2 cups water in a pot and bring to a boil. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes.
  3. Strain and use for golden milk. (This recipe will make the exact amount of infusion you will need for the golden milk.)

Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

  1. Gently warm the chai spice infusion, coconut milk, cashew milk, ginger and turmeric in a pot. Do not boil.
  2. When hot, pour into a blender with the honey, vanilla and salt and blend until smooth.
  3. Pour over ice and serve immediately.

Recipe Notes

Want to make your own cashew milk? Here's my recipe.
Want to use a pre-blended chai mix? Try the Chai Traditions Blend by Wild Foods

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Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Mediterranean Beet Hummus

beet hummus
beet hummus
Photo by: Ketino Photography

If you want to wow your guests at your next get together, beet hummus. This healthy snack is vibrant in both taste and color and is sure to impress. Use it as a dip, place a scoop on top of salads or spread it in sandwiches or wraps.

Health Bennies – 

  • High in protein
  • Vitamin C
  • B vitamins
  • High fiber
  • Helps liver “detoxify” the body
  • High in monounsaturated (healthy) fat
  • High in antioxidants
  • Anti-inflammatory
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Mediterranean Beet Hummus

You will need a food processor for this recipe.
Cuisine Dairy free, Gluten free
Servings 2 Cups

Ingredients

  • 1 each Red beet medium size
  • 1 Tablespoon Grapeseed oil or other high heat oil
  • 3 cloves Garlic peeled
  • 1 can Chickpeas 15.5 oz.
  • 1 Tablespoon Tahini
  • 1 each Lemon juice
  • 1.5 teaspoon Sea Salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon Black pepper ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon Caraway ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cumin ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon Coriander ground
  • 1/2 cups Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
  • 2 Tablespoons Water

Garnish

  • 1 teaspoon Sesame seeds
  • 1 Tablespoon Hemp seeds hulled
  • 1 Tablespoon Pumpkin seeds shelled
  • 6 sprigs Dill chopped

Instructions

For the beets

  1. Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Drizzle beet with grapeseed oil, wrap it in foil and roast in oven for 1 1/2 hours until tender.
  3. Unwrap beet and let cool.
  4. Peel and and discard the skin. Cut into a large dice.

For the hummus

  1. Chop the garlic in a food processor.
  2. Add the diced beet, chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice, salt, pepper and spices. Puree until smooth, scraping down sides as needed.
  3. While the food processor is running slowly drizzle in the EVOO followed by 2 Tablespoons of water. Let machine run as long as it needs to in order to create a smooth puree.
  4. Adjust seasonings as necessary.
  5. Place hummus in a medium bowl and top with garnishes and a drizzle of EVOO.

Recipe Notes

Need Tahini? Try the "Ziyad Tahini Sesame Sauce".
Need Hemp seeds? Try the "Nutiva Organic Hempseed"
Need Pumpkin seeds? Try the "Now Foods Organic Pumpkin Seeds"

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Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Pozole Rojo

Pozole rojo
Pozole rojo
Pozole Rojo (Mexican pork and hominy stew with red chiles)

Pozole Rojo is one of those dishes that conjers up fond memories for me.

Working my way up through the ranks in the restaurant industry I learned a lot about various cuisines and how to cook them authentically. I cooked under some of the best Chefs in the bay area.

But as much as I enjoyed learning from these Chefs I learned just as much from my fellow cooks.

One of the most memorable meals I learned to make was not on the menu of any of the places I worked.

It was a dish that was made for staff meal one day.

In professional kitchens in San Francisco, and in a large portion of America, the staff is mostly made up of Latinos. For me, the times I really got to see these guys shine and show off their cooking chops was not during service but during those staff meals.

You might find a few cooks huddled around a blender or crouched down in a corner with a pot of meat and a bag of tortillas. Smiles on their faces generating sounds of laughter.

It was when they were cooking, sharing and enjoying the foods they grew up on that I saw them the happiest.

I was lucky because I was a part of that crew in the corner, dishing up tacos at eleven at night, after a long service. A skinny young white girl and a handful of Latino line cooks. I talked to them in my best spanglish and they talked back in their best broken english. But when it came to the food, there was no translation needed.

They were proud of that food. And I felt fortunate to learn how to cook it from them, instead of from a cookbook.

That most memorable meal, for me, was the first time a cook from Mexico taught me how to make pozole. Pozole is a stew made with slow cooked meat (usually chicken or pork), chiles and hominy.

He taught me how to make pozole rojo (red) and although there are 3 types of pozole – red, green and white, I always make red to this day.

It was a big deal the day we decided to make pozole. The anticipation in the kitchen was so strong, cooks could hardly focus on setting up their stations.

We came into work early, cut up large chunks of pork from every area of the pig, even from the head (which is the best part for this stew). We soaked dried chiles and blended them with whole cloves of garlic and their soaking liquid and then braised the pork in that liquid.

The pork simmered all day long until the meat fell from the bones and the fat and cartilage became one with the broth.

We added cooked hominy to the stew and prepared a large tray of chopped fresh vegetables which would be used later for garnish.

All lined up with soup bowls, we took turns filling them with the hot pork and hominy stew. They were all eager to show me how to sprinkle dried oregano, chopped onion, cabbage and radish on top of my portion along with a handful of tortilla chips for dipping.

I had never experienced Mexican Food like this before. The flavors were deep and rich and the broth was so fortified with gelatin from the pork that it stuck to my lips. It was pure bliss.

What made it even more special was that, for once, there were no conflicts, complaints or negative attitudes for an entire shift. Virtually unheard of in a restaurant kitchen. It wasn’t staff meal that day, it was family meal.

I later found out that pozole is a celebratory dish. Looking back now, it explains all the excitement that it stirred up that day. This was a special occasion meal.

I’ll never forget how that dish brought us all together.

It is hands down my favorite Mexican dish to this day.

Pozole rojo
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Pozole Rojo

These days I often make this dish in a crock pot. Since it takes all day to cook, a crock pot makes it more accessible when you have to work during the day. I use pork shoulder in this recipe but you can also use ribs, trotters or any part of the head if you are lucky enough to have access to that.
Cuisine Dairy free, Gluten free
Servings 3 Quarts

Ingredients

Pozole

  • 2 cups Water
  • 1/2 ounce Dried Guajillo Chiles (about 2 each), de-seeded, stems removed
  • 1 ounce Dried Ancho Chiles (about 2 each), de-seeded, stems removed
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2 pounds Pork shoulder cut into large chunks
  • 1/2 each Yellow onion large dice
  • 1 quart Chicken stock
  • 1 tsp Dried Oregano
  • 1/2 tsp Cumin ground
  • TT Salt & Pepper
  • 1 (25 oz.) can Hominy (drained and rinsed)

Garnishes

  • 1/2 head Green Cabbage shredded
  • 1 bunch Radishes sliced
  • 2 each Avocados sliced
  • 2 each Limes cut into wedges
  • 1/2 each Yellow onion diced
  • 1 bunch Cilantro roughly chopped
  • 1/2 bag Tortilla Chips

Instructions

  1. Bring the 2 cups water to a boil. Place the chiles and garlic in a bowl, pour the boiling water over them, cover the bowl and let it sit 20 minutes.
  2. While the chiles are softening place the pork shoulder, yellow onion, chicken stock, oregano, cumin, salt and pepper in a crock pot and turn it on low.
  3. Place the soaked chiles, garlic and water in a blender and puree until smooth. Pour the mixture into the crock pot, give it a stir, cover and let cook 8 hours.
  4. Add the hominy to the crock pot and let cook 15 minutes more.
  5. Taste the stew to check for seasonings. Ladle it into bowls and top with garnishes to serve.

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Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Roasted Seaweed And Turmeric Popcorn

turmeric popcorn

turmeric popcorn

 

 

 

I’ve been getting inspiration for this salty snack all over the place lately. Food & Wine Magazine, 101 Cookbooks and The Poke Cookbook all have awesome versions of this wether it be seaweed or turmeric popcorn.

What makes mine different I guess is the hodgepodge of ingredients I have going on here. Popcorn, as we know, was first domesticated in Mexico, turmeric originates from India and seaweed can be found being consumed anywhere near a coastline. I also threw in some cashews, which are originally native to Brazil.

So why the con-fusion? Because it tastes good!

This tasty snack packs a nutrient punch and is an excellent substitution for chips or crackers.

Health bennies:

  • High in calcium
  • Good source of iron
  • Good source of omega-3s
  • High fiber
  • Antioxidant
turmeric popcorn
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Roasted Seaweed And Turmeric Popcorn

I like to use SeaSnax (link posted below recipe) for this mix because I find it to be crunchier and easier to crumble than most roasted nori seaweed I find. *Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Cuisine Gluten free
Servings 1 gallon

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Popcorn kernels non-gmo
  • 4 Tbsp Butter grass-fed
  • 3/4 tsp Shichimi Togarashi
  • 1/2 tsp Turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tsp Sea salt (I use pink Himalayan salt)
  • 2 Tbsp Furikake
  • 1 cup Cashews roasted and salted
  • 2 pkgs SeaSnax roasted seaweed (.18 oz packs)

Instructions

  1. Pop the popcorn in an air popper or stove top.
  2. Melt the butter and stir in the shichimi togarashi, turmeric, sea salt and furikake.
  3. In a large bowl toss together the popcorn, cashews and butter-spice mixture.
  4. Crumble the SeaSnax finely into the popcorn mixture and toss to combine.
  5. This snack mix will stay fresh for 2-3 days. After that the popcorn starts to become stale.

Recipe Notes

Need SeaSnax? Buy "SeaSnax Roasted Seaweed Grab and Go Packs"
Need Shichimi togarashi? Buy "Shichimi Togarashi - Japanese Mixed Chili Pepper"
Need Furikake? Buy "Nori Komi Furikake (Rice Seasoning)"

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

How To Make A Golden Milk Latte

golden milk latte
golden milk latte
Golden Milk Latte

Have a chai latte addiction? If, so you’re gonna love this. A golden milk latte is a spin on an Ayurvedic tonic that has been around thousands of years. Due to the rise in apothecary shop and high end tea lounge popularity its become a trendy new treat.

So what is golden milk? To answer that question you must start with golden turmeric, a spice blend consisting of turmeric, black pepper and ginger.

These spices create a delicious, warming drink that increases blood circulation, aids digestion and helps keep the immune system strong.

You have two options here. You could buy a pre-made blend such as, Moondeli, sold at Homestead Apothecary in Oakland. They flavor theirs with cardamom and pink Himalayan salt.

Moondeli golden turmeric
Moondeli Golden Turmeric
Homestead Apothecary
Homestead Apothecary

Or, you can make your own. Scroll down to the bottom of the page for my recipe. I liked the idea of using cardamom and pink Himalayan salt, so I too have added those to my recipe as well as ground cinnamon for some added sweetness.

Golden Turmeric
Golden Turmeric

Once you have your golden turmeric you can make golden milk. Again, you have a couple options here.

The first option is to buy a pre-made golden milk. The Living Apothecary, also based out of Oakland, makes a delicious vegan version using their house-made almond milk.

Living Apothecary
The Living Apothecary

They use local, organic almonds soaked over night to make their milk and then season it with California dates, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, all spice, clove, pink Himalayan salt and vanilla. This is a super high quality product that I highly recommend if you are not going the DIY route.

Simply warm the milk and either whisk or blend in a blender to make a frothy latte.

 

Living Apothecary
The Living Apothecary milks and kefirs

Making your own golden milk is simple too. Use a ratio of 1 teaspoon golden turmeric to 1 cup milk, of your desired choice, and whisk together well.

Now for the fun part. Want to make a golden milk latte from scratch? Here’s how…

golden milk latte
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Golden Milk Latte

I like to use cashew milk for my lattes for the creaminess and thickness. You can also use regular cow's milk, almond milk, coconut milk or any other milk of your choice. I also add coconut oil to the latte. That and the black pepper help your body absorb the curcumin in the turmeric more fully. Curcumin is the active compound in turmeric that is credited for giving it it's anti-inflammatory properties. As you can see here, I have first given you the ingredients to make your own golden turmeric. This batch makes a little over a half cup. That way you have extra leftover to use the next time you want to make a golden milk latte. If you opt out of making your own, skip this step and just use 1 teaspoon of pre-made golden turmeric for your latte. ***Use organic ingredients whenever possible
Cuisine Dairy free, Gluten free
Servings 1 serving

Ingredients

Golden Turmeric

  • 4 tbsp Dried Turmeric ground
  • 1 tsp Black pepper ground
  • 1 tbsp Dried Ginger ground
  • 2 tsp Pink Himalayan Salt
  • 1 tsp Cardamom seeds ground
  • 1 tsp Cinnamon ground

Golden Milk Latte

  • 1 cup Cashew Milk Home-made or store bought
  • 1 tsp Golden turmeric
  • 1 tsp Coconut oil
  • 1/4 tsp Vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp Raw honey

Instructions

Golden Turmeric

  1. Whisk all of the spices together well and store in an airtight container at room temperature. Use as needed.
    Golden Turmeric

Golden Milk Latte

  1. In a small pot heat the milk, golden turmeric and coconut oil until warm. Do not boil.
  2. Remove from the heat and whisk in the vanilla and honey. Whisk vigorously to make the drink frothy or blend in a blender for even more frothiness before serving.

Recipe Notes

Want to make your own cashew milk? Here's my recipe.
Want to buy pre-made golden turmeric? Buy it here.
Want to buy pre-made golden milk? Buy it here.

  • Disclaimer: The health benefits described here are for educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the food and drug administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Egyptian Dukkah Seasoning

Egyptian dukkah seasoning

Egyptian dukkah seasoning

What is a Dukkah Seasoning?

Dukkah seasoning, sometimes spelled duqqa, is a combination of nuts and seeds flavored with herbs and spices that originated in Egypt.

It can be mixed with olive oil to dip your bread into (my personal fave), sprinkled on dips like hummus or used as a crunchy component on top of vegetables, grains, meats and salads.

It is a simple, strait forward way to add flavor, texture, protein and antioxidants to any dish.

Egyptian dukkah seasoning
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Egyptian Dukkah Seasoning

Save time by buying roasted nuts. Feel free to swap ingredients out for others that you prefer more. There are no rules with dukkah except that it has to include nuts, herbs and spices. I like to use a mortar and pestle for this recipe, if you don't have one you can pulse the mixture in a food processor or place the ingredients under a towel and crush them with a mallet or back of a sauté pan.
Cuisine Dairy free, Gluten free
Servings 1 cup

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Hazelnuts shelled, raw, blanched
  • 1/4 cup Pistachios shelled, raw
  • 1/4 cup Marcona almonds or shelled raw almonds
  • 2 teaspoons Pine nuts raw
  • 2 teaspoons Pumpkin seeds shelled, raw
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cumin seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon Caraway seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon Fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon Sesame seeds white, raw
  • 1 teaspoon Sesame seeds black, raw
  • 1 teaspoon Oregano dried
  • 1 teaspoon Peppermint dried
  • 1 teaspoon Maldon Salt or coarse sea salt
  • 6 grinds Black pepper

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat oven 350 degrees.
  2. Spread the hazelnuts, pistachios, almonds, pine nuts and pumpkin seeds out on to a sheet pan and roast in the oven for about 10 minutes until they are lightly brown and fragrant. Let cool.
  3. In a small sauté pan toast the cumin, caraway, fennel seeds and black and white sesame seeds over medium heat for about 3-4 minutes until they become fragrant. Let cool.
  4. In a bowl mix together the toasted nuts, seeds, spices, herbs, salt and pepper.
    dukkah seasoning
  5. Depending on the size of your mortar and pestle or food processor you may need to work in batches from here.
  6. Place the mixture into the mortar and pound it down with the pestle. Use the pestle to mix and grind the mixture into a finely chopped consistency. You are not looking for a powder just chopped and consistent in size.

Recipe Notes

Need Marcona Almonds? Buy a "California Grown Marcona Almonds"
Need Dried Peppermint? Buy an "Organic Dried Peppermint Leaves (Mentha Piperita)"

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.