How To Make A Golden Milk Latte

golden milk latte
golden milk latte
Golden Milk Latte

Have a chai latte addiction? If, so you’re gonna love this. A golden milk latte is a spin on an Ayurvedic tonic that has been around thousands of years. Due to the rise in apothecary shop and high end tea lounge popularity its become a trendy new treat.

So what is golden milk? To answer that question you must start with golden turmeric, a spice blend consisting of turmeric, black pepper and ginger.

These spices create a delicious, warming drink that increases blood circulation, aids digestion and helps keep the immune system strong.

You have two options here. You could buy a pre-made blend such as, Moondeli, sold at Homestead Apothecary in Oakland. They flavor theirs with cardamom and pink Himalayan salt.

Moondeli golden turmeric
Moondeli Golden Turmeric
Homestead Apothecary
Homestead Apothecary

Or, you can make your own. Scroll down to the bottom of the page for my recipe. I liked the idea of using cardamom and pink Himalayan salt, so I too have added those to my recipe as well as ground cinnamon for some added sweetness.

Golden Turmeric
Golden Turmeric

Once you have your golden turmeric you can make golden milk. Again, you have a couple options here.

The first option is to buy a pre-made golden milk. The Living Apothecary, also based out of Oakland, makes a delicious vegan version using their house-made almond milk.

Living Apothecary
The Living Apothecary

They use local, organic almonds soaked over night to make their milk and then season it with California dates, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, all spice, clove, pink Himalayan salt and vanilla. This is a super high quality product that I highly recommend if you are not going the DIY route.

Simply warm the milk and either whisk or blend in a blender to make a frothy latte.

 

Living Apothecary
The Living Apothecary milks and kefirs

Making your own golden milk is simple too. Use a ratio of 1 teaspoon golden turmeric to 1 cup milk, of your desired choice, and whisk together well.

Now for the fun part. Want to make a golden milk latte from scratch? Here’s how…

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.
Print Recipe
Golden Milk Latte
I like to use cashew milk for my lattes for the creaminess and thickness. You can also use regular cow's milk, almond milk, coconut milk or any other milk of your choice. I also add coconut oil to the latte. That and the black pepper help your body absorb the curcumin in the turmeric more fully. Curcumin is the active compound in turmeric that is credited for giving it it's anti-inflammatory properties. As you can see here, I have first given you the ingredients to make your own golden turmeric. This batch makes a little over a half cup. That way you have extra leftover to use the next time you want to make a golden milk latte. If you opt out of making your own, skip this step and just use 1 teaspoon of pre-made golden turmeric for your latte. ***Use organic ingredients whenever possible
golden milk latte
Servings
serving
Ingredients
Golden Turmeric
Golden Milk Latte
Servings
serving
Ingredients
Golden Turmeric
Golden Milk Latte
golden milk latte
Instructions
Golden Turmeric
  1. Whisk all of the spices together well and store in an airtight container at room temperature. Use as needed.
    Golden Turmeric
Golden Milk Latte
  1. In a small pot heat the milk, golden turmeric and coconut oil until warm. Do not boil.
  2. Remove from the heat and whisk in the vanilla and honey. Whisk vigorously to make the drink frothy or blend in a blender for even more frothiness before serving.
Recipe Notes

Want to make your own cashew milk? Here's my recipe.

Want to buy pre-made golden turmeric? Buy it here.

Want to buy pre-made golden milk? Buy it here.

 

  • Disclaimer: The health benefits described here are for educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the food and drug administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 
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Herbal Water

Ever been to a day spa where they handed you a glass of water full of sliced lemon or cucumber? Remember how refreshing that was?

Herbal waters take seconds to make and they can brighten your mood in an instant. You don’t need a recipe, you can use whatever fresh herbs, citrus or fruit you have lying around.

Are you trying to get more glasses of water in everyday but the thought of a plain glass of water bores you? Maybe you are trying to ween yourself of soda or juice? Herbal water is a terrific substitution for that. And besides staying hydrated you get the added bonus of getting nutrients from the herbs.

So here’s what you do…

  • Fill up a pitcher with filtered water.
  • Add a handful of fresh herbs and/or sliced fresh fruit thats in season.
  • Stir.
  • Sip on it throughout the day.
  • If you have leftovers at the end of the day refrigerate it and drink the rest the next day.

Here’s some combos that I enjoy…

  • Mint & lemon
  • Lemon verbena & nectarine
  • Basil & berries
  • Rose petals & lime
  • Mint & pomegranate
  • Basil & melon
  • Rosemary & cherries
  • Fennel fronds & orange
  • Thyme & strawberries
  • Basil & peach

Health bennies:

  • Hydrating
  • Cooling
  • Relaxing
  • Great source of vitamins, minerals & flavonoids
  • Healthy substitute for sugary sodas and juices
Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Tea For Digestion

Tea for digestion

What if you could ensure optimal digestion at every meal? No bloating, no heartburn, no abdominal pain and increased nutrient absorption.

There are many factors that are involved in digesting a meal well. Portion size, thoroughly chewing your food, the way you are sitting, how fast you are eating, etc.

But what if I told you that the drink that accompanies your meal also plays a huge role in how you digest it?

Hot vs. Cold. In Ayurveda, the 5000 year old North Indian science of life, they believe if you consume cold beverages you weaken the “digestive fire” that energizes your digestive system inhibiting you to get properly nourished from food. On the other hand drinking hot or warm beverages stoke this fire and stimulates digestion.

To drink or not to drink? You could also argue that drinking too much fluid wether it be hot or cold will over-dilute stomach acid and impair digestion as well. Because of this many believe you shouldn’t drink anything at all during a meal.

Drinking before a meal. Drinking water a half hour before a meal has been said to aid in digestion and even help with weight loss. By giving you a sense of fullness before you even start eating, drinking the glass of water before the meal may make you less likely to overeat.

Spiced teas are another way to go and my personal favorite. Something as basic as steeping fresh ginger in hot water to drink with your meal is one of the oldest and most common ways to stoke that “digestive fire”. The recipe I have designed below is sort of a combination of three different teas I like to make myself. They all benefit digestion so combining them made sense to me. It also tastes great.

Health bennies:

  • Ginger – warming, stimulates enzymes in the saliva which helps break down our food, improves circulation, increases energy, clears congestion.
  • Turmeric – warming, anti-inflammatory.
  • Black pepper – helps activate the curcumin in the turmeric which is responsible for turmeric’s anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Cumin, coriander & fennel seeds – good source of minerals and magnesium, helps prevent acid indigestion.
  • Fresh lemon – helps to detoxify the liver.
  • Raw honey – good for your immune system, high in antioxidants.

I know what you are thinking right now….but, I love ice water, an ice cold beer or chilled wine with my dinner. If you are in that category I invite you to notice how you feel at the end of a meal that you accompany an ice cold drink with. Then have a meal either drinking a warm beverage like ginger tea or nothing at all and compare it to the other meal. You may find no difference at all. You may see a dramatic difference. And if you do, you can choose to incorporate this practice into your daily routine as just one more thing you do to improve your health.

Do you have a preferred beverage to drink with meals? Why is this drink your go to? Do you love the flavor? Does it make you feel good? Does it cool you down or warm you up?

I would love to hear from you.

Tea For Digestion

Yield – 2 1/4 cups

2 cups Filtered water

1 – 1 in. piece Ginger, peeled and grated (about 1 teaspoon)

1 – 1 in. piece Turmeric, peeled and grated (about 1 teaspoon) or  (1/2 teaspoon powdered turmeric)

1/8 teaspoon (about 6-8 each)  Black peppercorns, crushed

1/4 teaspoon Cumin seeds, crushed

1/4 teaspoon Coriander seeds, crushed

1/4 teaspoon Fennel seeds, crushed

1/2 Lemon (I love using Meyer lemons for this, but a regular lemon also works great)

2 teaspoons Raw honey

Directions:

  • Combine the water, ginger, turmeric and dried spices in a small pot and bring to a boil over high heat.
  • Reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer 10 minutes.
  • Remove from the heat, strain and stir in the juice of half a lemon and the honey.
  • Enjoy while the tea is still warm on its own or with a meal to stoke your digestive fire.

Grated turmeric

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Hippie Hemp Seed Milk

hemp seed milk

I remember back in my early teens listening to The Dead while making macramé necklaces and bracelets with hemp. Never did I imagine in a million years I would be making milk from hemp seeds over 20 years later.

This is one thing that is great about the health food industry. It is always looking for the nutritional benefits of anything and everything so they can find the next trendy thing to sell. Sometimes it’s a sham but sometimes we totally reap the benefit.

Enter hemp seeds. Not only are they great for digestion and keeping inflammation down, they are very versatile as well. You can sprinkle them on yogurt or salads, add them to granola, healthy energy bars or desserts make them into a pesto and yes you can make milk out of them.

Health bennies:

  • Good balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids which is crucial to fighting chronic inflammation.
  • A complete protein – contains all 20 amino acids (including the 9 essential amino acids that our bodies can’t produce).
  • High fiber
  • Good source of minerals – Calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc
  • Good source of vitamins – Vitamin A, D & E and a variety of B vitamins.

Hemp Seed Milk

 Yield – 3 cups

½ cup Hemp seeds, raw & hulled

2 cups Filtered water

1 Tablespoon Raw honey

1 pinch Sea salt

1 teaspoon Vanilla extract

Directions:

  • Place hemp seeds in a large glass jar and cover them with filtered water, let sit on counter for 6 hours, strain and rinse well.
  • Combine the soaked hemp seeds, 2 cups filtered water, raw honey, salt and vanilla  in a blender and blend for one minute
  • Store in a glass jar with tight fitting lid in the fridge up to 5 days.

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Creamy Cashew Milk

Cashew Milk

Step aside almond milk. There’s a new non-dairy sheriff in town and it’s name is cashew milk. Y’all be cool.

OK, all movie jokes aside I’m in love with cashew milk. It’s sweet, it’s creamy and the cashews break completely down in the blender so there is virtually no waste to strain out. It’s great in coffee, tea, cereal, you name it.

Health bennies:

  • Excellent dairy substitute for those who are lactose intolerant.
  • Good source of protein, iron, magnesium and vitamin K.

Creamy Cashew Milk

*Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

Yield – 2 3/4 cups

1/2 cup Raw cashews

3 cups Filtered water

  • Combine cashews and water in a 1 quart glass jar and let sit on the counter for 6 hours. Drain & rinse.

2 cups Filtered water

1/2 cup Soaked cashews

1 teaspoon Vanilla extract

1/8 teaspoon Sea salt

Directions:

  1. Place 2 cups water, soaked cashews, vanilla extract and sea salt in a blender and blend for one minute.
  2. Strain through a fine mesh sieve.
  3. Store cashew milk in a glass jar with a tight fitting lid for up to 5 days.
Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Matcha-mint chip shake

matcha-mint chip shake

When I was a kid I LOVED mint chip ice-cream. Now a days I veer more toward strait up chocolate but the taste and smell of mint with chocolate still gets me nostalgic.

This shake makes a great afternoon pick me up. It’s also very cooling at the same time which I think makes a great balance.

Matcha is one of those ingredients making headlines on every health blog right now. It’s being used in smoothies, desserts, healthy snacks and of course as a tea. It has a wonderfully fresh grassy taste, which when paired with the mint in this shake tastes really refreshing.

Health bennies:

Matcha – High in antioxidants, boosts your immune system and increases energy.

Matcha-mint chip shake

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

Yield – 1 serving

1 cup Coconut milk, unsweetened

1 teaspoon Matcha powder

1/2 cup Fresh mint leaves

2 Tablespoons Cocoa nibs

1 teaspoon Vanilla extract

1 teaspoon Vitamineral green (optional)

pinch of sea salt

TT Stevia (optional sweetener, I personally leave it out)

1 cup ice

Directions:

  • Blend all ingredients in blender. Drink immediately.
Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Ume Kuzu Tea

Umeboshi plums
Umeboshi Plums

This is not one of those teas I drink for flavor. It’s more for medicinal purposes. It’s great for indigestion, headaches, hangovers, the common cold, relieving fatigue and restoring energy. I have to admit, however that it amps me up a bit so if you are effected by caffeine (like I am) be aware you might get a little cracked out from this tea.

Health bennies:

Umeboshi plums – Alkaline, balances the acidity in your stomach and blood.

Kuzu root – Soothes the stomach and strengthens the intestines, high in flavonoids.

Ume Kuzu Tea

Yield: 1 cup

1 teaspoon kuzu root starch (dissolved in 3 teaspoons cold filtered water)

1 cup filtered water

1/2 teaspoon umeboshi paste

Directions:

  • Place the kuzu (that has been dissolved in water) and the cup of water in a small pot. Whisking constantly bring the mixture to a simmer (water will turn clear).
  • Remove from heat, let cool slightly and whisk in the umeboshi paste.
  • Drink while warm.

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.