Cold Asian Noodle Salad

Cold Asian Noodle Salad
Cold Asian Noodle Salad
Photo by Ketino Photography

There is nothing more satisfying on a hot night than a grilled piece of meat and a cold Asian noodle salad. There is something about the smokiness of the meat that pairs perfectly with the vinegar and the cold crunchy vegetables in this salad.

This salad can be made ahead of time to eat all throughout the week. It is perfect for picnics and a great meal to take with you to work for lunch.

Too busy to prep all of these veggies? Do your knife skills sorta suck? Many grocery stores now sell vegetables pre-sliced in the produce section. Using these will cut your prep time on this dish way down and take some of the stress out of getting dinner on the table.

Cold Asian Noodle Salad
Photo by Ketino Photography
Cold Asian Noodle Salad
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Cold Asian Noodle Salad

* Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

Servings 2 Servings

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces Rice noodles
  • 3 sprigs Cilantro whole leaves
  • 3 sprigs Mint whole leaves
  • 3 sprigs Basil whole leaves
  • 1 each Scallion sliced thin
  • 2 inches English cucumber sliced into half moons
  • 1 each Radish sliced thin
  • 1/4 cup Carrot julienned
  • 1/2 cup Red bell pepper julienned
  • 10 each Snap peas julienned
  • 1 Tbsp Sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp Rice vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp Bragg Liquid Aminos
  • TT Sea salt and black pepper

Instructions

  1. Follow the cooking directions on the package of rice noodles. After they are cooked, rinse well under cold water and strain. 

  2. Toss the cooked, cold noodles with the rest of the ingredients and serve. 

Recipe Notes

Need Sesame oil? - Buy it here

Need Rice vinegar? - Buy it here

Need Bragg Liquid Aminos? - Buy it here

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Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Simple Beet Poke

beet poke
beet poke
Photo by Ketino Photography

When I first moved to Hawaii I just about overdosed on tuna poke. It is one of my favorite dishes of all time.

Although traditionally made with fish, poke can be made with just about any ingredient you like. To give myself a break time to time, from the mercury that is found in large fish like tuna, I make poke with beets.

This simple preparation of beet poke can be used as an appetizer, side dish or healthy mid-afternoon snack and stays fresh in the fridge up to a week.

To mimic the color of local Hawaiian Bigeye tuna I use red beets. I also use traditional poke condiments like inamona –  roasted and ground kukui nuts, alaea – red Hawaiian sea salt and fresh Hawaiian chile. I have provided substitutes in the recipe below if you are unable to source these Hawaiian ingredients.

beet poke
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Simple Beet Poke

Use local organic ingredients when possible. Ground hazelnuts or macadamia nuts can be substituted for the inamona, red jalapeño or fresno chiles can be used to substitute the Hawaiian chile and grey or pink sea salt can be used instead of alaea.

Servings 2 Servings

Ingredients

  • 4 each Small Red beets washed, leaves removed
  • 2 Tablespoons Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 Tablespoon Rice Vinegar unseasoned
  • 1/2 each Red Hawaiian Chile minced
  • 1 teaspoon Inamona
  • 1 sprig Mint chopped
  • TT Alaea (Red Hawaiian Sea Salt)
  • TT Black pepper ground

Instructions

Roasted beets

  1. Pre-heat oven 350 degrees. 

  2. Toss the beets with 1 Tablespoon Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and wrap tightly in foil. Place on a pan and roast in the oven for about an hour or until tender.

    beet poke
  3. Remove from oven, unwrap the beets and allow them to cool completely. 

  4. Peel the beets and cut them into quarters. 

Beet Poke

  1. In a bowl, mix together the beets, 1 Tablespoon Extra-Virgin Olive Oil, rice vinegar, Hawaiian chile, inamona, mint, alaea and black pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings as necessary. 

  2. Serve cold or at room temperature.

Recipe Notes

Need alaea? - Buy it here

Inamona can be difficult to find if you do not live in Hawaii. If you are determined to use it, instead of using one of the substitutions suggested above, I have found one website that ships. The quantities are large but you can always keep it in your freezer and take it out as needed. Need inamona? - Buy it here

Need unsweetened rice vinegar? - Buy it here

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Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Roasted Seaweed And Turmeric Popcorn

turmeric popcorn

turmeric popcorn

 

 

 

I’ve been getting inspiration for this salty snack all over the place lately. Food & Wine Magazine, 101 Cookbooks and The Poke Cookbook all have awesome versions of this wether it be seaweed or turmeric popcorn.

What makes mine different I guess is the hodgepodge of ingredients I have going on here. Popcorn, as we know, was first domesticated in Mexico, turmeric originates from India and seaweed can be found being consumed anywhere near a coastline. I also threw in some cashews, which are originally native to Brazil.

So why the con-fusion? Because it tastes good!

This tasty snack packs a nutrient punch and is an excellent substitution for chips or crackers.

Health bennies:

  • High in calcium
  • Good source of iron
  • Good source of omega-3s
  • High fiber
  • Antioxidant
turmeric popcorn
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Roasted Seaweed And Turmeric Popcorn

I like to use SeaSnax (link posted below recipe) for this mix because I find it to be crunchier and easier to crumble than most roasted nori seaweed I find. *Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Cuisine Gluten free
Servings 1 gallon

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Popcorn kernels non-gmo
  • 4 Tbsp Butter grass-fed
  • 3/4 tsp Shichimi Togarashi
  • 1/2 tsp Turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tsp Sea salt (I use pink Himalayan salt)
  • 2 Tbsp Furikake
  • 1 cup Cashews roasted and salted
  • 2 pkgs SeaSnax roasted seaweed (.18 oz packs)

Instructions

  1. Pop the popcorn in an air popper or stove top.
  2. Melt the butter and stir in the shichimi togarashi, turmeric, sea salt and furikake.
  3. In a large bowl toss together the popcorn, cashews and butter-spice mixture.
  4. Crumble the SeaSnax finely into the popcorn mixture and toss to combine.
  5. This snack mix will stay fresh for 2-3 days. After that the popcorn starts to become stale.

Recipe Notes

Need SeaSnax? Buy "SeaSnax Roasted Seaweed Grab and Go Packs"
Need Shichimi togarashi? Buy "Shichimi Togarashi - Japanese Mixed Chili Pepper"
Need Furikake? Buy "Nori Komi Furikake (Rice Seasoning)"

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Delicata Squash Roasted With Turmeric and Shichimi Togarashi

Delicata Squash Roasted with Turmeric

Delicata Squash Roasted with Turmeric

Delicata squash is the easiest squash to prep. Not to mention, Delicata squash roasted, is really quite tasty.

What makes this variety stand out from the rest is it’s delicate skin. Hence the name! You can chop it up, cook it and eat it without ever pulling out your peeler. The skin is totally edible.

And although all it really needs is salt and pepper to do the trick I like to spice it up with some turmeric and Shichimi Togarashi – a japanese spice blend made up of red chili pepper, sesame seeds, orange zest, ginger and seaweed to add a little zest to it. It goes really well with some steamed rice in my opinion.

Delicata Squash Roasted with Turmeric
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Delicata Squash Roasted With Turmeric and Shichimi Togarashi

Shichimi togarashi is spicy. If you don't care for spicy food omit it and try this recipe with sweet paprika instead.
Cuisine Dairy free, Gluten free
Servings 4 Servings

Ingredients

  • 1 each Delicata Squash about 1 pound, rinsed well
  • 1 Tablespoon Grapeseed oil or other high heat oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon Turmeric powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon Shichimi Togarashi
  • 1/2 teaspoon Sea salt
  • 6 grinds Black pepper
  • 6 Sprigs Cilantro chopped
  • 1/4 each Lime

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat oven 350 degrees.
  2. Slice squash in half lengthwise and remove the seeds.
    squash sliced in half lengthwise
  3. Slice each half in 1/2 inch moons.
    sliced squash
  4. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. Toss the squash with grapeseed oil, turmeric, Shichimi Togarashi, sea salt and black pepper.
    squash prep
  5. Roast the squash in the oven for about 20-25 minutes or until you can insert a knife easily into the squash. You are looking for tender, not mushy.
  6. Finish the squash with chopped cilantro and a squeeze of lime.

Recipe Notes

Need Grapeseed oil? -Buy "La Tourangelle, Grapeseed Oil"
Need Shichimi Togarashi? -Buy "Shichimi Togarashi - Japanese Mixed Chili Pepper"

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Roasted Cauliflower With Radicchio And Wheat Berries

This roasted cauliflower dish not only tastes delicious but is vibrant and beautiful as well. There are many different colors of cauliflower available these days. Purple, green, orange (also called cheddar) and of course white. Mix them up for fun if you like, they all taste the same!

You can make this recipe gluten free by omitting the wheat berries.

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Roasted Cauliflower With Radicchio And Wheat Berries

You can substitute farro or barley for the wheat berries if you can't find them. They all cook up just about the same.
Cuisine Dairy free
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

Cauliflower

  • 1 head Cauliflower cut into florets
  • 2 cloves garlic smashed
  • 2 Tablespoons Grapeseed oil
  • 6 Sprigs Thyme chopped
  • TT S&P

Wheat Berries

  • 1/2 cup Wheat berries soaked overnight, drained and rinsed

Salad

  • 1 cup Radicchio sliced thin
  • 1 each Scallion sliced thin
  • 2 Tablespoons Parsley Chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon Mint chopped
  • 1/2 Lemon juiced
  • TT S&P

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat oven 400 degrees.
  2. Toss together cauliflower, garlic, grapeseed oil and thyme and season with S&P. Spread on to a sheet pan and roast for 20 minutes or until tender. Place into a large mixing bowl.
  3. While cauliflower is roasting place the wheat berries in a pot, cover with water, add a pinch of salt and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook about 20 minutes until tender. Drain and add to the mixing bowl with the roasted cauliflower.
  4. Add to the bowl the radicchio, scallion, parsley, mint, and lemon juice, season with S&P to taste and toss everything to combine. Serve warm.

Recipe Notes

What I love to use making this recipe:

La Tourangelle, Grapeseed Oil
Bob's Red Mill Wheat Hard Red Spring Wheat Berries

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Wild Rice And Kale Salad

This wild rice and kale salad studded with roasted beets and goat cheese makes a beautiful side dish or completely satisfying main course.

Make a big batch at the beginning of the week. This salad holds up great and is just as good cold as it is warm.

 

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Wild Rice And Kale Salad

Cuisine Gluten free
Servings 4 cups

Ingredients

Roasted beets

  • 2 tbsp Grapeseed oil
  • 3 each Baby beets (5 if they are very small) cleaned, tops removed

Wild rice

  • 1 tbsp Grapeseed oil
  • 1/4 each Yellow onion small dice
  • 1 each (small) Carrot small dice
  • 1 rib Celery small dice
  • TT Sea salt and pepper
  • 1 clove garlic minced
  • 10 sprigs Thyme chopped
  • 1/2 cup Wild Rice rinsed
  • 1 1/2 cups Water
  • 1 tbsp Parsley chopped

Kale

  • 1/2 bunch Kale washed, stems removed, chopped
  • 1/2 each Lemon juiced
  • TT Sea salt and pepper
  • 2 tbsp Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 tbs Pine nuts
  • 2 oz Goat cheese

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat oven 350 degrees.
  2. Toss the beets in 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil and wrap tightly in aluminum foil. Place package on a sheet pan and roast in the oven until tender, about 1 hour - 1 hour, 15 minutes.
  3. When a toothpick can be inserted easily the beets are ready. Let the beets cool slightly, peel them by rubbing them with a paper towel and slice them in half.
  4. While the beets are roasting make the wild rice. Place the remaining grapeseed oil, diced onion, carrot and celery in a small pot and place over medium heat. Season with salt and pepper and saute until tender.
  5. Add the garlic and thyme and cook one minute more.
  6. Add the wild rice and water and bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook 45 minutes to an hour or until tender.
  7. Fluff rice with a fork and set aside.
  8. In a large bowl add the kale, lemon juice and a pinch of salt. Massage the leaves with your hands breaking down the fibers until they are soft.
  9. Add the halved beets, wild rice, extra-virgin olive oil and pine nuts to the bowl. Adjust seasoning as needed with salt and pepper. Toss to combine and crumble the goat cheese over the top.

What I love to use making this recipe:
La Tourangelle, Grapeseed Oil
Minnesota Cultivated Wild Rice
Live Organic Pine Nuts

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Eat your sea vegetables

IMG_1206
Seaweed salad

Last week I took the dive into furthering my education and started my one year course with The Institute for Integrative Nutrition.

Something really hit home for me the other day while watching one of my online classes. It wasn’t so much the statement that was said  but the impact I thought that the information would have on people in our society. They said very simply, “a portion of seaweed and sesame seeds contain more calcium than a glass of milk”.

Now, if you are from the U.S. you grew up being told that you need to drink milk to get calcium and build strong bones. And honestly back in the 50’s when people were milking their own cows and drinking raw milk it probably was one of the best ways to get your calcium. These days we are finally starting to learn (because we are finally starting to ask questions and care) that the ultra processed cows milk we drink has probably been stripped of most of it’s nutrients leaving a sugary beverage produced from animals raised on GMO grains. Is it time to start looking for our calcium elsewhere?

Their are many other foods that are high in calcium:

  • Fish
  • Beans
  • Almonds
  • Citrus
  • Sesame seeds
  • Leafy green vegetables

But lets get back to Seaweed. Seaweed is a great source of calcium and what’s even better  is how sustainable of a crop it is. It has no carbon footprint, relies on sunlight as energy to produce food and reproduces at rapid speed. This is great news for the environment. Next is their nutrients….

Health bennies:

Seaweed – High in chlorophyll and antioxidants. Contains calcium, magnesium, trace minerals, vitamin A & C ,cancer fighting omega-3 fatty acids, lignans and are a great source of iodine (which is important for maintaining a healthy thyroid).

Now, what about those sesame seeds?

Sesame seeds – High in calcium, also contain trace minerals, magnesium, iron, vitamin B1, dietary fiber and lignans.

Point is you can get all the nutrients you need in a variety of foods. Perfect example, calcium doesn’t just come from milk.  It is time to start questioning the mass marketed ingredients and look outside the box. What you were told as a kid might not be the case anymore. As you may notice nutritional guideline change every year, more information and studies come out each year and it’s always evolving. The only way to learn is through exposure. So turn of your TV and start digging deeper.

 

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Seaweed salad

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Mixed seaweed (red dulse, wakame & sea palm fronds are all great options)
  • 3 Tablespoons Brown rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Toasted sesame oil
  • 1 Tablespoon Tamari
  • 1/4 teaspoon Sea salt
  • 1/2 inch piece Ginger minced
  • 1 ea. Scallion sliced thin
  • 1 Tablespoon Sesame seeds

Instructions

  1. Soak the seaweed in cold water for 5 minutes. Drain and squeeze out excess water.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients, stir well and refrigerate 1 hour-overnight before eating.

Recipe Notes

Need red dulse Try this!
Need wakame? Try this!
Need sea palm fronds? Try this!
Need Brown rice vinegar? Try this!
Need Toasted sesame oil? Try this!
Need Tamari? Try this!
Need Sea salt? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Fall farmers market salads

Shaved root vegetables

“Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.” – Confucius

Last month a couple of friends and I hosted a pig roast to celebrate fall and have a feast. Although the pig came out terrific and was definitely the focal point of the party I got complimented most about the salads that accompanied it.

I didn’t spend hours coming up with these salads and I didn’t use any recipes. Instead I walked the farmers market the day before the party and got inspired.

Most times in cooking  you do not need a recipe to have an incredible dish. The ingredients that are laid out for you in your local farmers markets tell you all you need to know. That and a little adventurous and ambitious spirit on your part.

Here are a few of the salads from the party. No recipes, just ingredients. And they can all be altered to suit your taste.

 

Shaved root vegetables
Shaved root vegetables
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Shaved root vegetables

Ingredients

  • Baby carrots sliced thin
  • - Fennel sliced thin + chopped fennel fronds
  • - Cioggia beets sliced thin (raw)
  • - Arugula
  • - Red wine vinegar
  • - EVOO
  • - S&P
Marinated squashes
Marinated winter squashes with prosciutto
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Marinated winter squashes with prosciutto

Ingredients

  • Raw acorn & delicata squashes peeled with a peeler to make ribbons
  • Prosciutto sliced thin
  • Pomegranate seeds
  • Sunflower sprouts
  • Parsley chopped
  • Mint chopped
  • Red onion sliced thin
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • EVOO
  • S&P
Persimmon and chicories
Persimmon & chicories
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Persimmon & chicories

Ingredients

  • – Persimmons peeled & sliced thin
  • – A variety of chicories
  • – Roasted & salted mixed nuts
  • – Shaved Parmigiano Reggiano
  • – Parsley chopped
  • – Dill chopped
  • – Lemon juice
  • – EVOO
  • – Raw honey
  • – S&P

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Mexican style steak salad

mexican steak salad

mexican steak salad

Hola! This is one of my favorite salads to make for dinner on a warm night. All you have to do is grill or sear up a steak, wack up some veggies and toss it all together and you have a quick, delicious and healthy meal. Muy rica! I like mine a little spicy so I add thinly sliced jalapeños, you can omit those if you don’t want the heat. I also usually cook up some dried beans for this too but if you don’t have the time canned beans work perfect. Just make sure you rinse them well first.

 

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Mexican style steak salad

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 2 entree salad

Ingredients

  • 1 each 12 oz. Grassfed Ribeye steak seasoned with S&P, dried oregano & granulated garlic
  • 1 Tablespoon Grapeseed oil or other high heat oil
  • 1 large handful of Romaine lettuce chopped
  • 1 large handful of Green cabbage sliced thin
  • 1 each Scallion sliced thin
  • 2 each Radishes sliced thin
  • 6 Black Cerignola olives or any other type of black olive you can find
  • 4 Tablespoons Queso Fresco , crumbled Feta works really well here too
  • 1/2 each Jalapeño sliced thin
  • 1/2 cup Canned Black beans rinsed (or 1/4 cup dried beans, soaked overnight and then simmered about an hour until tender)
  • 1 large handful Cherry tomatoes halved
  • 1/4 bunch Cilantro chopped
  • 1 each Avocado sliced
  • 1 each Lime juiced
  • a good drizzle of EVOO
  • TT S&P
  • TT Granulated garlic & dried oregano

Instructions

  1. - Get a grill or saute pan hot over high heat and add about a tablespoon of grapeseed oil

  2. - Sear the steak 2-3 minutes on each side (turn heat down to med-high if pan starts to get to hot and steak starts to burn) until medium-rare.
  3. - Remove steak from the pan and let rest on a cutting board for 5 minutes.
  4. - Toss the rest of the ingredients together in a large bowl and then separate the salad on to two plates.
  5. - Thinly slice the steak and put half on each salad.

Recipe Notes

Need Grapeseed oil? Try this!
Need Black Cerignola olives? Try this!
Need Queso Fresco? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Roasted beets with seeds, farro and spiced yogurt

roasted beets with farro

roasted beets with farro

This dish takes a little bit of time to make but if you do some prep ahead of time it makes it a lot more manageable. The farro and beets can be cooked and the yogurt sauce can be made the morning of or the day before. Then when it come time to eat all you have to do is dress the ingredients and plate them up!

Health bennies:

Beets – Great source of fiber, vitamin A & C, healthy carbs, and many important minerals.

Whole Grain Farro – High in fiber, contains vitamin B3 and zinc, good source of protein and iron. *Favorite brand – Bob’s Red Mill organic farro Note, buying pearled farro will greatly reduce your cooking time but in the case of pearled farro the bran has been removed therefore removing many of it’s nutritional properties.

Greek Yogurt – High in probiotics which is great for healthy digestion, high in calcium, a good source of essential fatty acids and protein.*Favorite brand – Straus Organic Plain Greek Yogurt

 

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Roasted beets with seeds, farro and spiced yogurt

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible
Servings 4

Ingredients

Farro:

  • 1 cup Farro
  • 2 Tablespoons Extra-virgin olive oil
  • TT S&P

Beets:

  • 5 each Beets medium size, washed, greens removed
  • 2 Tablespoons Grapeseed oil
  • 2 Tablespoons Extra-virgin olive oil
  • TT S&P
  • 1 Tablespoon + 1 teaspoon Apple cider vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon Parsley chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon Dill chopped

Yogurt sauce:

  • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt plain
  • 1/4 teaspoon Coriander ground
  • 1/8 teaspoon Cumin ground
  • TT S&P
  • 1 clove Garlic minced
  • 1/2 lemon juiced

Garnishes:

  • Chia seeds
  • Hemp seeds
  • Sesame seeds
  • Pea sprouts or sunflower sprouts, tossed in lemon juice, S&P

Instructions

For the farro:

  1. Rinse the farro under cold water, place in a pot with a hefty pinch of salt and cover with cold water by 1 inch. Bring to a boil, turn down to a simmer and cook covered about 30 minutes. (Cooking time will vary according to what kind of farro you have, read the package for their suggested cooking time.)
  2. When the farro is tender, strain off the water, toss with 2 Tablespoons EVOO, season with S&P and lay out on a plate to cool.

For the beets:

  1. - Toss beets in 2 Tablespoons grapeseed oil (or other high heat oil), wrap them tightly in foil and roast in a 350 degree oven for 1 1/2-2 hours until tender. (Cooking time will depend on the size of your beets.)
  2. - Once the beets are cool enough to handle peel off the skin, cut them into quarters and toss them with the EVOO, apple cider vinegar, S&P, parsley and dill.

For the yogurt sauce:

  1. - Whisk together the greek yogurt, coriander, cumin, S&P, garlic and lemon juice from half a lemon.

To Plate:

  1. - Start with a swipe of the yogurt sauce along the bottom of a large platter (or serve the sauce on the side).
  2. - Spoon the farro over the top and then arrange the beets on top of the farro. Garnish with pea shoots and a sprinkling of chia, hemp and sesame seeds.

Recipe Notes

Need Farro? Try this!
Need Apple cider vinegar?  Try this!
Need Greek yogurt? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.