Savory Granola

Savory granola is something you can use on yogurt for breakfast, sprinkled in salads for lunch or as a delicious snack. With only 2 tablespoons of raw honey this is the perfect granola for anyone trying to cut way back on sugar. With so much flavor packed in from all the nuts, seeds and spices you’ll never want to go back to sweet granola again.

Local spotlight:

For this recipe I used nuts and seeds from G.L. Alfieri Farms (Ripon, CA).

G.L. Alfieri Nuts

Health bennies:

  • Oats – High in fiber and protein.
  • Nuts – Great source of protein and healthy fat.
  • Pumpkin & sunflower seeds – High in important minerals such as phosphorus, magnesium and copper.
  • Sesame seeds – Great source of calcium, magnesium and other important minerals, contain lignans which can have a cholesterol-lowering effect.
  • Coriander, ginger, cardamom – Stimulates digestion, anti-inflammatory.
  • Cayenne – Stimulates digestion & blood circulation, antibacterial, dissolves congestion, helps you absorb nutrients from other foods.
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Savory Granola

Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

Servings 6 cup

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoon Raw honey
  • 4 cups Rolled Oats
  • 1/8 cup Pumpkin seeds
  • 1/8 cup Sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 cup Almonds raw, chopped
  • 1/4 cup Pistachios raw, shelled, chopped
  • 1/4 cup Pecans raw, chopped
  • 1/4 cup Cashews raw, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Sea Salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon Black pepper freshly ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon Coriander ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon Ginger ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cardamom ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
  • 2 tablespoons Sesame seeds raw

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 300 degrees.
  2. In a small pot melt the coconut oil and raw honey together over medium-low heat. About 5 minutes.
  3. In a large bowl combine the oats, nuts, pumpkin & sunflower seeds, salt, pepper, all of the spices and the coconut oil-honey mixture. Stir well.
  4. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper and spread the granola mixture on to it in an even layer.

  5. Bake for  1 hour, or until golden brown, giving the mixture a stir every 10 minutes or so.
  6. Let cool completely.
  7. Stir in the sesame seeds and store in airtight containers at room temperature.
  8. Granola will stay fresh for 3 weeks.

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut oil? Try this
Need Sea salt? Try this
Need Oats? Try these
Need Parchment Paper? Try this

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Indian Dahl and Rice

Indian dahl and rice

This is a delicious dish that fires up the digestive system, is great for the immune system and is very cleansing.   Feel free to swap out chard for any other kind of dark leafy green you like and to completely omit the tofu if desired.

Health bennies –

Herbs & spices – Good for the immune system, circulation and digestion. Anti-inflammatory, detoxifying, anti-microbial.

Dahl & brown rice – Complete protein, alkalinizing, good source of calcium, b vitamins, iron, vitamin E, amino acids &  linoleic acid. High in fiber, good for digestion, balances blood sugar.

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Indian Dahl & Rice

*Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Brown rice rinsed well
  • 2 cups Water
  • 1 Tablespoon Coconut oil cold pressed, unrefined
  • 1 each Carrot small dice
  • 1/2 each Yellow onion small dice
  • 2 ribs Celery small dice
  • 1 clove Garlic minced
  • 1/2 in. Ginger minced
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon Cardamom ground
  • 1 teaspoon Turmeric dried
  • 1 teaspoon Mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon Ceylon Cinnamon , ground
  • 1 teaspoon Cumin ground
  • 1 teaspoon Paprika
  • 1/8 teaspoon Nutmeg ground
  • 1 cup Mung dahl rinsed well
  • 1  - 14 oz. can Coconut milk unsweetened
  • 1 - 14 oz. can Whole peeled tomatoes blended into a puree
  • 1 bunch Chard stems removed & chopped
  • 1 cup firm Tofu large dice
  • TT S&P
  • 1/2 each Lemon
  • Handful fresh mint & cilantro leaves

Instructions

  1. Fill a small pot with 2 cups water and bring to a boil, add the rice, stir once, season with a pinch of salt and when it comes back up to a boil, reduce heat to low and cook covered for 45 minutes. Turn off heat let sit covered another 10 minutes. Fluff rice with a fork.
  2. While the rice is cooking cook the dahl. In a large pot melt the coconut oil and add the carrot, onion & celery. Cook over medium heat until they start to soften.
  3. Add the garlic, ginger, bay leaves and spices. Sauté 2 minutes.
  4. Add the mung dahl, coconut milk and tomato puree. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook about 45 minutes or until the dahl is tender.
  5. Add the chard to the pot, stir and wilt down.
  6. Fold in the diced tofu, season with S&P. and a squeeze of lemon juice.
  7. Serve over brown rice and garnish with fresh mint and cilantro.

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut oil? Try this!
Need Ceylon Cinnamon? Try this!
Need Mung dahl? Try this!
Need Tofu? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Amaranth Breakfast Porridge

Amaranth breakfast porridge

Once used regularly by the Aztecs, amaranth grain offers up a powerful protein punch and great start to your day. It is a great option for people with Celiac disease being that it is gluten free. In addition you could also make a savory version with greens, mushrooms, herbs and spices and have it for lunch or dinner.

Health bennies:

  • A complete protein (contains 18 amino acids)
  • High fiber
  • Good source of iron, calcium & magnesium
  • Contains vitamins A, C & B-6
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Amaranth Breakfast Porridge

*Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 1

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Amaranth grain
  • 1 cup Water

Optional garnishes:

  • Ghee
  • Raw honey
  • Sea salt
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Fruit/berries
  • Bee Pollen

Instructions

  1. Combine the amaranth and water in a small pot. Bring to a boil, reduce to low heat, cover and cook 15-20 minutes stirring occasionally.
  2. When all of the liquid has been absorbed remove from heat and let sit covered 10 more minutes.
  3. Serve and garnish as desired.

Recipe Notes

Need Amaranth grain? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Kitchari

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Kitchari (sometimes also called khichdi or kichadi) is an Ayurvedic recipe from east India that is often used for cleansing. It literally means the mixture of grain and bean.

Ayurveda is one of my favorite health science studies, one because it stresses that every individual is different and therefore needs to customize their diet to fit their own needs and two because of it’s extensive use of spices used for healing. Spices can heat you up, cool you down, boost your immune system and help you digest food more effectively. Spices, in Ayurveda are chosen for specific dishes based on your dosha.

The ingredients in kitchari actually balance all three dosha types and is often eaten for 1-3 days strait with no other foods (but with plenty of warm water) as a cleanse for the lymph system.

Here is my version.

 

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Kitchari

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 6

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Brown rice , rinsed
  • 1 cup Mung dal , rinsed
  • 1 Tablespoon Ghee
  • 1 Carrot small diced
  • 1 Zucchini small diced
  • 1 Yellow Squash small diced
  • 1/2 in. Ginger fresh, peeled and minced
  • 1 bu. Red Chard washed, stems removed, chopped
  • TT Sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Coriander ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon Cumin ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon Mustard seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon Turmeric
  • 1/4 teaspoon Black pepper ground
  • 1/4 bu. Cilantro chopped

Instructions

  1. - Place rice, mung dal and 4 cups of water in a pot. Bring to a boil, lower to a simmer, cover and cook 45 minutes. Turn off heat, let sit covered 10 more minutes.
  2. - Meanwhile in a separate pot melt the ghee over medium low heat and start cooking the carrots. After a few minutes add the zucchini and squash and a pinch of salt. Cook slowly until all vegetables are tender.
  3. - Add the ginger and all of the spices, cook 1 more minute.
  4. - Add the chard and continue cooking until tender.
  5. - When the rice and mung dal are cooked, fluff them with a fork, strain off any excess water and add them to the pot with the vegetables and spices.
  6. - Add the cilantro and stir to combine.

Recipe Notes

Need Brown rice?  Try this!
Need Mung dal?  Try this!
Need Ghee? Try this!
Need Sea salt? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

White bean and wild rice soup

white bean and rice soup

white bean and rice soup

Fall is here which means it’s time to start making soup again. Being on the cusp of summer/fall as we do here in the bay area in October I have also added some zucchini and yellow squash to this recipe. This is just a strait up satisfyingly good hearty soup. Great for cold nights or if your in San Francisco the best weather of the year….

 

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White bean and wild rice soup

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 3 quart

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons Avocado oil (or other good cooking oil)
  • 1 small Yellow onion diced
  • 2 ribs Celery diced
  • 1 large Carrot diced
  • 2 cloves Garlic minced
  • 1/4 bunch Thyme chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon Tomato paste
  • 2 quarts Chicken stock
  • 1 cup White beans soaked in water 4-6 hours & drained
  • 1/2 cup Wild rice
  • 1 each Zucchini diced
  • 1 each Yellow squash diced
  • 1/2 bunch Chard diced
  • 1/4 bunch Parsley chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon Oregano chopped
  • TT chile flakes
  • TT S&P
  • 1/2 each Lemon

Instructions

  1. In a large heavy pot sweat the onion, celery and carrot with avocado oil on medium heat.
  2. Add the garlic, thyme, tomato paste and a pinch of black pepper and sauté another few minutes.
  3. Add the beans, rice and stock and bring to a boil. Reduce to low heat, cover and cook about 2 hours.
  4. Add the squashes and chard, increase the heat to medium, cover the pot and cook another 20 minutes or so until the squash is tender.
  5. Turn off the heat add the parsley, oregano and juice from 1/2 a lemon. Season the soup to taste with salt, pepper and chile flakes.

Recipe Notes

Need Avocado oil? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Not your boring 3 bean salad

3 bean salad

3 bean salad

I do a lot with beans these days. They are so rich in nutrients and protein that its sort of a no brainer. You can eat them cold, hot, pureed, in salads, in soups, as a side dish, in chili… I’ve even made cakes with them (no s%*t!). Three bean salad is one of my boyfriend’s favorites. Coming from the days his Mom used to open 3 different cans of beans and dump Italian dressing all over them, I have taken that basic idea here and just juiced it up a bit. Most importantly I removed all the sugar (that you get out of bottled Italian dressing) and added some fresh raw vegetables and herbs. Make it ahead of time, store it in the fridge and snack on it all week.

 

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Not your boring 3 bean salad

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 6

Ingredients

  • 1 can Garbanzo beans drained & rinsed
  • 1 can Black beans drained & rinsed
  • 1 can Kidney beans drained & rinsed
  • 1 each Red bell pepper small diced
  • 2 each Scallions sliced thin
  • 1/2 bunch Cilantro chopped
  • 1 each Red beet peeled, sliced thin & cut into matchsticks (julienned)
  • 1-2 each Carrots peeled, sliced thin & cut into matchsticks (julienned)
  • TT S&P
  • TT Red wine vinegar
  • TT EVOO (or even better yet flax oil !)

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl combine all three beans, bell pepper, scallions and cilantro. Season the mixture with S&P, a splash of red wine vinegar and EVOO. Toss thoroughly.
  2. In a separate bowl combine the beets and carrots, season them with S&P, a splash of red wine vinegar and EVOO. Toss thoroughly.
  3. To plate, place the bean mixture on a plate or in a bowl and garnish with a handful of beets and carrots.

Recipe Notes

Need flax oil?  Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Roasted beets with seeds, farro and spiced yogurt

roasted beets with farro

roasted beets with farro

This dish takes a little bit of time to make but if you do some prep ahead of time it makes it a lot more manageable. The farro and beets can be cooked and the yogurt sauce can be made the morning of or the day before. Then when it come time to eat all you have to do is dress the ingredients and plate them up!

Health bennies:

Beets – Great source of fiber, vitamin A & C, healthy carbs, and many important minerals.

Whole Grain Farro – High in fiber, contains vitamin B3 and zinc, good source of protein and iron. *Favorite brand – Bob’s Red Mill organic farro Note, buying pearled farro will greatly reduce your cooking time but in the case of pearled farro the bran has been removed therefore removing many of it’s nutritional properties.

Greek Yogurt – High in probiotics which is great for healthy digestion, high in calcium, a good source of essential fatty acids and protein.*Favorite brand – Straus Organic Plain Greek Yogurt

 

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Roasted beets with seeds, farro and spiced yogurt

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible
Servings 4

Ingredients

Farro:

  • 1 cup Farro
  • 2 Tablespoons Extra-virgin olive oil
  • TT S&P

Beets:

  • 5 each Beets medium size, washed, greens removed
  • 2 Tablespoons Grapeseed oil
  • 2 Tablespoons Extra-virgin olive oil
  • TT S&P
  • 1 Tablespoon + 1 teaspoon Apple cider vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon Parsley chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon Dill chopped

Yogurt sauce:

  • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt plain
  • 1/4 teaspoon Coriander ground
  • 1/8 teaspoon Cumin ground
  • TT S&P
  • 1 clove Garlic minced
  • 1/2 lemon juiced

Garnishes:

  • Chia seeds
  • Hemp seeds
  • Sesame seeds
  • Pea sprouts or sunflower sprouts, tossed in lemon juice, S&P

Instructions

For the farro:

  1. Rinse the farro under cold water, place in a pot with a hefty pinch of salt and cover with cold water by 1 inch. Bring to a boil, turn down to a simmer and cook covered about 30 minutes. (Cooking time will vary according to what kind of farro you have, read the package for their suggested cooking time.)
  2. When the farro is tender, strain off the water, toss with 2 Tablespoons EVOO, season with S&P and lay out on a plate to cool.

For the beets:

  1. - Toss beets in 2 Tablespoons grapeseed oil (or other high heat oil), wrap them tightly in foil and roast in a 350 degree oven for 1 1/2-2 hours until tender. (Cooking time will depend on the size of your beets.)
  2. - Once the beets are cool enough to handle peel off the skin, cut them into quarters and toss them with the EVOO, apple cider vinegar, S&P, parsley and dill.

For the yogurt sauce:

  1. - Whisk together the greek yogurt, coriander, cumin, S&P, garlic and lemon juice from half a lemon.

To Plate:

  1. - Start with a swipe of the yogurt sauce along the bottom of a large platter (or serve the sauce on the side).
  2. - Spoon the farro over the top and then arrange the beets on top of the farro. Garnish with pea shoots and a sprinkling of chia, hemp and sesame seeds.

Recipe Notes

Need Farro? Try this!
Need Apple cider vinegar?  Try this!
Need Greek yogurt? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Heirloom beans

heirloom beans

heirloom beans

If you’re from San Francisco chances are you’ve heard of (and are probably in love with) Rancho Gordo, a company from Napa, CA that specializes in preserving indigenous New World seeds. Their products range from heirloom beans and grains to spices, tortillas and beyond. They have growers all over North America and co-ops in South America, an online store, their showroom in Napa and a brick and mortar inside the Ferry Building in San Francisco. Rancho Gordo is a staple in bay area high end restaurants and in my home.

So what’s the big deal with these heirloom seeds? These seeds have been handed down from generation to generation unadulterated, resistant to diseases, still have all of their nutrients and our far superior in flavor than a lot of the ravaged seeds that are planted today. The more we let these heirloom seeds disappear the less and less plant varieties we have to grow. There used to be 3,000 types of apples native to North America. Now there are only about a couple dozen. (I could keep going on an on about the effect that has on our soil, etc. but I’m going to stay on track here.)

Beans, although they take some time are very easy to cook. Just soak them overnight, rinse, place in a pot, cover with water and simmer until tender. If you have a pressure cooker you can cut the cooking time way down (which can sometimes be up to an hour). One of my favorite ways to serve beans are cold tossed with crunchy vegetables, fresh herbs and a citrusy vinaigrette.

 

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Heirloom bean salad

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Rancho Gordo Sangre de Toro beans dried or any other type of bean you like
  • 3 cloves Garlic 2 smashed, 1 minced
  • 2 large sprigs of Basil 1 left whole, 1 chopped
  • Black pepper ground
  • 1 Celery heart the inner ribs and leaves of the celery stalk, sliced thin
  • 1 Jalapeno seeds removed, minced
  • 1/2 each Red bell pepper small diced
  • 1 Scallion sliced thin
  • 4 sprigs of Parsley chopped
  • 4 sprigs of Cilantro chopped
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 3 Tablespoons Extra-virgin olive oil
  • TT Salt & pepper
  • 1 pinch Cumin ground

Instructions

  1. - Place beans in a large container and cover with 4 cups of water. Refrigerate overnight.
  2. - The next day, drain the beans and rinse under cold water. Place in a medium size pot with 2 cloves smashed garlic, 1 large sprig of basil and a couple pinches of ground black pepper. Cover with cold water and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until tender. Depending on the bean this could take up to an hour sometimes longer. Always make sure the beans are fully submerged in water.
  3. - When the beans are tender remove them from the heat and let cool in its liquid.
  4. - Strain the beans and discard the garlic and basil.
  5. - Place beans in a medium sized bowl and toss with minced garlic, chopped basil, celery, jalapeño, red bell pepper, scallion, parsley, cilantro, lime juice, EVOO, S&P and cumin.

Recipe Notes

Need Rancho Gordo Sangre de Toro beans? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Gallo Pinto

gallo pinto
gallo pinto
Breakfast at Cascata de Bosco Hotel in Costa Rica – Local eggs, house-made bread & gallo pinto

Fresh back from a trip to Costa Rica with a new love for Tico cuisine. There were many wonderful things I had to eat and drink in CR. Tropical fruits, smoothies, BBQ pork, fresh fish and fried plantains were plentiful, but if you really want to get down to the heart and soul of this country’s cooking you’re talking rice and beans. White rice and  black beans are a staple with almost every meal in CR. At lunch and dinner they are served plain and separate on the plate but at breakfast they are mixed together to form a wonderful dish called Gallo Pinto. Pura Vida on a plate.

Health bennies – 

rice & beans – Served together these two foods combine all of the essential amino acids making them into a complete protein. The beans also offset the rice’s ability to rise sugar levels as quickly as when it is eaten alone.

White rice – Contains iron, thiamine & folate (which develops new cells).

Black beans – High in antioxidants, fiber, protein, complex carbohydrates, calcium and iron. Lowers bad cholesterol and keeps blood sugar balanced. For maximum nutritional benefit it is recommended that you eat 3 cups of beans a week.

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Gallo Pinto

Servings 3

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Dried black beans organic
  • 3 cups Water
  • 2 Tablespoons Coconut oil
  • 1/2 each Yellow onion organic, small dice
  • 1/2 each Red sweet pepper organic (bell pepper works), small dice
  • 1/2 each Green sweet pepper organic (bell pepper works), small dice
  • 2 cloves Garlic organic, minced
  • 1 cup White organic Basmati rise rinsed
  • 1.5 cups Water
  • S&P
  • 1/2 bunch Cilantro organic, chopped

Instructions

  1. - Soak the black beans in 3 cups of water overnight. The next day drain off the water and place beans in a pot. Cover with fresh water (an inch higher than the beans) and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until tender, about an hour or so. Season the beans with salt and pepper and then set aside.
  2. - In a large skillet melt the coconut oil and sauté the onion and peppers with salt and pepper until soft. Add the garlic, sauté 1 more minute. Add the rice, mix thoroughly and then add 1 1/2 cups water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook 15 min. Turn off heat and let sit covered another 5 minutes. Remove lid and fluff rice with a fork.
  3. - Strain the liquid off of the beans and discard. Toss the beans and the chopped cilantro with the rice and serve.

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut oil? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Quinoa-vegetable wraps

Quinoa-vegetable wrap

Quinoa-vegetable wrap

Wraps are great because you can make a bunch of them, wrap them in plastic wrap and keep them in your fridge for an on the go healthy lunch.

Health bennies:

Quinoa – Packed full of antioxidants, protein, calcium and  fiber, stimulates your metabolism,  is low glycemic and gluten free (it is a seed not a grain). Because quinoa is a complete protein this food is an excellent choice for vegetarians.

Raw cabbage – Has numerous cancer-preventing properties mainly due to the fact that it is very high in antioxidants. Read more about cabbage’s cancer fighting powers here. It is also a proven cure for stomach ulcers, detoxifies the stomach which makes digestion more efficient, it alkalinizes the body and is good for the immune system.

Hummus – Contains healthy fats that promote a healthy brain and heart, high in fiber and protein.

 

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Quinoa-vegetable wraps

Servings 6 wraps

Ingredients

  • 6 Tortillas or any kind of wrapper that you like, I have used here a local spinach & onion gluten free tortilla, blanched collard green leaves also work great as a wrapper
  • 1 cup Quinoa , rinsed
  • 3 Tablespoons Parsley chopped
  • 3 Tablespoons Cilantro chopped
  • 1/2 cup Olives chopped (any kind you like)
  • 1 Tablespoon Red wine vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon Extra-virgin olive oil
  • TT Salt & pepper
  • 1/3 head Red cabbage sliced thin
  • 1 each Bell pepper sliced thin
  • 1 each Carrot sliced thin
  • 1 cup Hummus preferably home-made but in a pinch store bought. Make sure the store bought stuff doesn't have any high fructose corn syrup or any other creepy ingredients in it.

Instructions

  1. - Bring 1 cup water to a boil, add the quinoa, return to a boil, turn heat down to low and cook covered for 15 minutes. After the 15 minutes are up turn the heat off and let sit covered 10 more minutes. Remove lid and fluff quinoa with a fork. Add the parsley, cilantro, olives, red wine vinegar, extra-virgin olive oil and salt & pepper mixing well to combine.
  2. - Spread each wrapper with a layer of hummus, top with your prepared quinoa, cabbage, bell pepper and carrot. Roll each one up tight and wrap in plastic wrap. Keep in your refrigerator up to a week.

Recipe Notes

Need Quinoa? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.