White bean and wild rice soup

white bean and rice soup

white bean and rice soup

Fall is here which means it’s time to start making soup again. Being on the cusp of summer/fall as we do here in the bay area in October I have also added some zucchini and yellow squash to this recipe. This is just a strait up satisfyingly good hearty soup. Great for cold nights or if your in San Francisco the best weather of the year….

 

Print

White bean and wild rice soup

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 3 quart

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons Avocado oil (or other good cooking oil)
  • 1 small Yellow onion diced
  • 2 ribs Celery diced
  • 1 large Carrot diced
  • 2 cloves Garlic minced
  • 1/4 bunch Thyme chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon Tomato paste
  • 2 quarts Chicken stock
  • 1 cup White beans soaked in water 4-6 hours & drained
  • 1/2 cup Wild rice
  • 1 each Zucchini diced
  • 1 each Yellow squash diced
  • 1/2 bunch Chard diced
  • 1/4 bunch Parsley chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon Oregano chopped
  • TT chile flakes
  • TT S&P
  • 1/2 each Lemon

Instructions

  1. In a large heavy pot sweat the onion, celery and carrot with avocado oil on medium heat.
  2. Add the garlic, thyme, tomato paste and a pinch of black pepper and sauté another few minutes.
  3. Add the beans, rice and stock and bring to a boil. Reduce to low heat, cover and cook about 2 hours.
  4. Add the squashes and chard, increase the heat to medium, cover the pot and cook another 20 minutes or so until the squash is tender.
  5. Turn off the heat add the parsley, oregano and juice from 1/2 a lemon. Season the soup to taste with salt, pepper and chile flakes.

Recipe Notes

Need Avocado oil? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Not your boring 3 bean salad

3 bean salad

3 bean salad

I do a lot with beans these days. They are so rich in nutrients and protein that its sort of a no brainer. You can eat them cold, hot, pureed, in salads, in soups, as a side dish, in chili… I’ve even made cakes with them (no s%*t!). Three bean salad is one of my boyfriend’s favorites. Coming from the days his Mom used to open 3 different cans of beans and dump Italian dressing all over them, I have taken that basic idea here and just juiced it up a bit. Most importantly I removed all the sugar (that you get out of bottled Italian dressing) and added some fresh raw vegetables and herbs. Make it ahead of time, store it in the fridge and snack on it all week.

 

Print

Not your boring 3 bean salad

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 6

Ingredients

  • 1 can Garbanzo beans drained & rinsed
  • 1 can Black beans drained & rinsed
  • 1 can Kidney beans drained & rinsed
  • 1 each Red bell pepper small diced
  • 2 each Scallions sliced thin
  • 1/2 bunch Cilantro chopped
  • 1 each Red beet peeled, sliced thin & cut into matchsticks (julienned)
  • 1-2 each Carrots peeled, sliced thin & cut into matchsticks (julienned)
  • TT S&P
  • TT Red wine vinegar
  • TT EVOO (or even better yet flax oil !)

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl combine all three beans, bell pepper, scallions and cilantro. Season the mixture with S&P, a splash of red wine vinegar and EVOO. Toss thoroughly.
  2. In a separate bowl combine the beets and carrots, season them with S&P, a splash of red wine vinegar and EVOO. Toss thoroughly.
  3. To plate, place the bean mixture on a plate or in a bowl and garnish with a handful of beets and carrots.

Recipe Notes

Need flax oil?  Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Mexican style steak salad

mexican steak salad

mexican steak salad

Hola! This is one of my favorite salads to make for dinner on a warm night. All you have to do is grill or sear up a steak, wack up some veggies and toss it all together and you have a quick, delicious and healthy meal. Muy rica! I like mine a little spicy so I add thinly sliced jalapeños, you can omit those if you don’t want the heat. I also usually cook up some dried beans for this too but if you don’t have the time canned beans work perfect. Just make sure you rinse them well first.

 

Print

Mexican style steak salad

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 2 entree salad

Ingredients

  • 1 each 12 oz. Grassfed Ribeye steak seasoned with S&P, dried oregano & granulated garlic
  • 1 Tablespoon Grapeseed oil or other high heat oil
  • 1 large handful of Romaine lettuce chopped
  • 1 large handful of Green cabbage sliced thin
  • 1 each Scallion sliced thin
  • 2 each Radishes sliced thin
  • 6 Black Cerignola olives or any other type of black olive you can find
  • 4 Tablespoons Queso Fresco , crumbled Feta works really well here too
  • 1/2 each Jalapeño sliced thin
  • 1/2 cup Canned Black beans rinsed (or 1/4 cup dried beans, soaked overnight and then simmered about an hour until tender)
  • 1 large handful Cherry tomatoes halved
  • 1/4 bunch Cilantro chopped
  • 1 each Avocado sliced
  • 1 each Lime juiced
  • a good drizzle of EVOO
  • TT S&P
  • TT Granulated garlic & dried oregano

Instructions

  1. - Get a grill or saute pan hot over high heat and add about a tablespoon of grapeseed oil

  2. - Sear the steak 2-3 minutes on each side (turn heat down to med-high if pan starts to get to hot and steak starts to burn) until medium-rare.
  3. - Remove steak from the pan and let rest on a cutting board for 5 minutes.
  4. - Toss the rest of the ingredients together in a large bowl and then separate the salad on to two plates.
  5. - Thinly slice the steak and put half on each salad.

Recipe Notes

Need Grapeseed oil? Try this!
Need Black Cerignola olives? Try this!
Need Queso Fresco? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Heirloom beans

heirloom beans

heirloom beans

If you’re from San Francisco chances are you’ve heard of (and are probably in love with) Rancho Gordo, a company from Napa, CA that specializes in preserving indigenous New World seeds. Their products range from heirloom beans and grains to spices, tortillas and beyond. They have growers all over North America and co-ops in South America, an online store, their showroom in Napa and a brick and mortar inside the Ferry Building in San Francisco. Rancho Gordo is a staple in bay area high end restaurants and in my home.

So what’s the big deal with these heirloom seeds? These seeds have been handed down from generation to generation unadulterated, resistant to diseases, still have all of their nutrients and our far superior in flavor than a lot of the ravaged seeds that are planted today. The more we let these heirloom seeds disappear the less and less plant varieties we have to grow. There used to be 3,000 types of apples native to North America. Now there are only about a couple dozen. (I could keep going on an on about the effect that has on our soil, etc. but I’m going to stay on track here.)

Beans, although they take some time are very easy to cook. Just soak them overnight, rinse, place in a pot, cover with water and simmer until tender. If you have a pressure cooker you can cut the cooking time way down (which can sometimes be up to an hour). One of my favorite ways to serve beans are cold tossed with crunchy vegetables, fresh herbs and a citrusy vinaigrette.

 

Print

Heirloom bean salad

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Rancho Gordo Sangre de Toro beans dried or any other type of bean you like
  • 3 cloves Garlic 2 smashed, 1 minced
  • 2 large sprigs of Basil 1 left whole, 1 chopped
  • Black pepper ground
  • 1 Celery heart the inner ribs and leaves of the celery stalk, sliced thin
  • 1 Jalapeno seeds removed, minced
  • 1/2 each Red bell pepper small diced
  • 1 Scallion sliced thin
  • 4 sprigs of Parsley chopped
  • 4 sprigs of Cilantro chopped
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 3 Tablespoons Extra-virgin olive oil
  • TT Salt & pepper
  • 1 pinch Cumin ground

Instructions

  1. - Place beans in a large container and cover with 4 cups of water. Refrigerate overnight.
  2. - The next day, drain the beans and rinse under cold water. Place in a medium size pot with 2 cloves smashed garlic, 1 large sprig of basil and a couple pinches of ground black pepper. Cover with cold water and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until tender. Depending on the bean this could take up to an hour sometimes longer. Always make sure the beans are fully submerged in water.
  3. - When the beans are tender remove them from the heat and let cool in its liquid.
  4. - Strain the beans and discard the garlic and basil.
  5. - Place beans in a medium sized bowl and toss with minced garlic, chopped basil, celery, jalapeño, red bell pepper, scallion, parsley, cilantro, lime juice, EVOO, S&P and cumin.

Recipe Notes

Need Rancho Gordo Sangre de Toro beans? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Gallo Pinto

gallo pinto
gallo pinto
Breakfast at Cascata de Bosco Hotel in Costa Rica – Local eggs, house-made bread & gallo pinto

Fresh back from a trip to Costa Rica with a new love for Tico cuisine. There were many wonderful things I had to eat and drink in CR. Tropical fruits, smoothies, BBQ pork, fresh fish and fried plantains were plentiful, but if you really want to get down to the heart and soul of this country’s cooking you’re talking rice and beans. White rice and  black beans are a staple with almost every meal in CR. At lunch and dinner they are served plain and separate on the plate but at breakfast they are mixed together to form a wonderful dish called Gallo Pinto. Pura Vida on a plate.

Health bennies – 

rice & beans – Served together these two foods combine all of the essential amino acids making them into a complete protein. The beans also offset the rice’s ability to rise sugar levels as quickly as when it is eaten alone.

White rice – Contains iron, thiamine & folate (which develops new cells).

Black beans – High in antioxidants, fiber, protein, complex carbohydrates, calcium and iron. Lowers bad cholesterol and keeps blood sugar balanced. For maximum nutritional benefit it is recommended that you eat 3 cups of beans a week.

Print

Gallo Pinto

Servings 3

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Dried black beans organic
  • 3 cups Water
  • 2 Tablespoons Coconut oil
  • 1/2 each Yellow onion organic, small dice
  • 1/2 each Red sweet pepper organic (bell pepper works), small dice
  • 1/2 each Green sweet pepper organic (bell pepper works), small dice
  • 2 cloves Garlic organic, minced
  • 1 cup White organic Basmati rise rinsed
  • 1.5 cups Water
  • S&P
  • 1/2 bunch Cilantro organic, chopped

Instructions

  1. - Soak the black beans in 3 cups of water overnight. The next day drain off the water and place beans in a pot. Cover with fresh water (an inch higher than the beans) and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until tender, about an hour or so. Season the beans with salt and pepper and then set aside.
  2. - In a large skillet melt the coconut oil and sauté the onion and peppers with salt and pepper until soft. Add the garlic, sauté 1 more minute. Add the rice, mix thoroughly and then add 1 1/2 cups water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook 15 min. Turn off heat and let sit covered another 5 minutes. Remove lid and fluff rice with a fork.
  3. - Strain the liquid off of the beans and discard. Toss the beans and the chopped cilantro with the rice and serve.

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut oil? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.