Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

Iced Coconut Chai Golden Milk
Iced Coconut Chai Golden Milk
Photo by: Ketino Photography

Since moving to Hawaii I crave iced drinks now more than ever. Golden milk was something I really got into right before leaving San Francisco and I’ve always been a chai tea junkie. In this recipe I took the best of both worlds combined them with thick coconut milk and threw the whole concoction over ice. Pure bliss on a hot day.

Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk
Print

Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

A great shortcut for this recipe is to buy an already pre-blended chai spice. I also like to use cashew milk in this recipe but almond, soy or regular cow's milk will work too. Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Cuisine Dairy free
Servings 2 cups

Ingredients

Chai Spice Infusion

  • 15 grams Cardamom seeds
  • 10 grams Star Anise whole
  • 8 grams Coriander seeds
  • 1 each Cinnamon stick
  • 5 grams Cloves whole
  • 5 grams Black Peppercorns whole
  • 1 gram Nutmeg ground
  • 1 gram Allspice whole

Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

  • 2 cups Chai Spice Infusion
  • 1/2 cup Coconut Milk unsweetened
  • 1/2 cups Cashew Milk
  • 1/2 inch Piece of ginger peeled and smashed
  • 1 inch Piece of fresh turmeric peeled and smashed
  • 1 teaspoon Raw honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt

Instructions

Chai Spice Infusion

  1. Lightly crush all spices with a mortar and pestle or with the back of a sauté pan.
  2. Place the spices and 2 1/2 cups water in a pot and bring to a boil. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes.
  3. Strain and use for golden milk. (This recipe will make the exact amount of infusion you will need for the golden milk.)

Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

  1. Gently warm the chai spice infusion, coconut milk, cashew milk, ginger and turmeric in a pot. Do not boil.
  2. When hot, pour into a blender with the honey, vanilla and salt and blend until smooth.
  3. Pour over ice and serve immediately.

Recipe Notes

Want to make your own cashew milk? Here's my recipe.
Want to use a pre-blended chai mix? Try the Chai Traditions Blend by Wild Foods

SaveSave

SaveSave

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Thai Butternut Squash Soup

Butternut squash soup

Winter is the time of year when you want to curl up with hot soups and stews for dinner.

Butternut squash soup is classic but can sometimes be overdone here in San Francisco. This recipe takes a riff on this already delicious soup and kicks it up a little.

Butternut squash soup
Print

Thai Butternut Squash Soup

Sweet, sour, creamy and a little spicy. This ain't your regular old b-nut squash soup. Use organic ingredients whenever available. Recipe by Spencer O'Meara
Cuisine Dairy free, Gluten free
Servings 6 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp Avocado oil
  • 1/2 each Yellow onion chopped
  • 1 tbsp Ginger minced
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 tsp Coriander ground
  • 5 cups Butternut squash large dice
  • 1 can (13.6 fl.oz) Coconut milk unsweetened
  • 2 cups Chicken stock unsalted
  • 1 each Fresh Kafir lime leaf
  • 1 tbsp Fish sauce
  • 1 each Lime juiced
  • TT Sea salt and pepper

Garnish

  • 4 tbsp Roasted cashews chopped
  • 1 each Red fresno chile sliced thin
  • 2 sprigs Mint chopped
  • 10 sprigs Cilantro chopped
  • 4 leaves Basil chopped

Instructions

  1. In a large pot cook the onion in avocado oil with a pinch of salt over medium heat until soft, about 5-10 minutes.
  2. Add the garlic, ginger and coriander, cook one more minute.
  3. Add the squash, coconut milk, stock and kafir lime leaf and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until squash is tender.
  4. Remove the kafir lime leaf and discard. Pour the soup into a blender, add the fish sauce and lime juice and blend on high until smooth. ***Place a towel over the top of the blender lid and secure with your hand when blending to ensure that hot liquid does not escape.
  5. Pour the soup into serving bowls and garnish with the cashews, herbs and chiles.

Recipe Notes

Need Avocado oil? - Buy "La Tourangelle, Avocado Oil"
Need Kafir lime leaf? -Buy a "Fresh ORGANIC Kaffir Lime Leaves"

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

The Healing Powers of Salt

Sea salt

Sea salt

Have you ever had a salt-water fish tank? If you have you know that as the water evaporates in the tank the salinity level increases requiring you to add more fresh water to maintain the correct salt to water ratio for the fish to thrive in.

Our bodies, like the salt-water tank, also require a certain salt to water ratio. Except that when we sweat and lose water in our “tank” the salt in our body seeps out our pours with it. Therefore, we must not only replenish water in our “tanks” but the salt too.

The Balance of salt and water in the body is crucial.

Do you wonder why sports drinks contain electrolytes? Electrolytes are essentially salts. When you work out or play sports you sweat. Electrolytes are placed in sports drinks to quickly replenish your body with salt and water. It is important to replenish with both salt and water to maintain proper balance and to stay hydrated.

Ever notice that you get a little swollen when you are dehydrated? Your body has too much salt and not enough water. You need to add water to balance your salinity.

Have you ever had athletes foot? Salt water not only balances the insides of your body but the outside too. Salt alkalizes the body. If you have a foot fungus it means that the PH level of your skin in that area is off. In other words your skin is too acidic and not enough alkaline. Soaking the foot in salt-water alkalizes the foot and brings the PH level of your skin back to the proper level.

What about muscle cramps or stiffness? This usually means you don’t have enough salt in your body. Time to re-balance. Taking a soak in an Epsom salt bath is a great way to do this.

If you aren’t sure if you need to replenish salt in your body don’t worry it is still safe to consume. Your body will take in the amount of salt it needs and eliminate the rest as long as you drink enough water.

Salts I recommend for food

Not all salts are created equal. Salts that have been processed have been stripped of many of their trace minerals and can often contain chemicals and additives. Eating processed foods high in sodium will not give you the same nutrional benefits that seasoning your food moderately with natural, pure salts will.

Here are the salts I suggest you use for seasoning your food with for nutritional benefit. They each contain all 82 trace minerals needed to adequately balance the body and are harvested naturally making them unprocessed and pure.

Celtic Sea Salt

This salt is naturally harvested in Brittany, France near the Celtic Sea,. The clay found in the salt fields where this salt is harvested ionizes the minerals in the salt and is what creates its grey color. Because of the clay this salt will appear damp.

Himalayan Salt

Mined by hand in and around Kewra, Pakistan in the Himalayas. There are several different mines supplying this prized salt, some have higher standards than others. It is naturally pink in color.

Red Hawaiian Alaea Salt

Hawaii’s Alaea volcanic clay is what makes this salt a deep red color and gives it an have amazing flavor. Because of the clay this salt will appear damp.

Salts I recommend for skin

Adding a couple cups of salt to a hot bath relaxes, restores and heals the body.

Himalayan Salt

This salt works great added to baths to balance the PH of your skin, detoxify and to relax muscles and joints.

Epsom salt

Otherwise known as Magnesium sulfate, this salt can be used both externally (in hot baths) or orally (as a form of laxative). This salt is known to relax sore muscles and heal achy joints, minor cuts and skin funguses when used in a hot bath.

Salts I recommend for drinking

Celtic grey salt

Add a pinch of this salt to a large glass of lukewarm water to drink every morning. This will replenish minerals, hydrate you and balance the PH level in your mouth and body.

Coconut water

A great alternative to sugary sports drinks. Coconut water is naturally high in electrolytes making it a perfect drink for replacing the body’s fluids and minerals lost after a good work out. If you have access to young green coconuts and are handy with a cleaver you’re stoked. If you are into convenience look for unpasteurized, unflavored coconut water that contains no preservatives. For the store bought stuff Harmless Harvest, Invo, Blue Monkey, Zico, Amy & Brian All Natural Coconut Juice and Zola are all great brands.

Natural Salt Health Bennies:

  • Regulates blood pressure – Helps raise low blood pressure and lower high blood pressure if consumed with plenty of water.
  • Clears mucus – Relieves congestion.
  • Balances blood sugars – Good for people with diabetes.
  • Maintains a healthy PH balance in the body – Both inside and out. The alkalinity of the salt balances excess acidity in the body to restore a proper PH balance.
  • Good for the immune system – Promotes a higher resistance to illness and infections and helps heal the body quicker after an injury.
  • Promotes good sleep – Creates a calming effect on the nervous system.
  • Prevents muscle cramps – Not enough salt in the body can cause cramps. Replenish minerals needed by consuming salt with plenty of water.
  • Treats joint pain and stiffness and sore muscles – Relaxes and restores minerals to problem areas.
  • Combats fatigue – Restoring sodium and trace minerals back into the body when deprived can increase energy in our cells.
  • Keeps brain cells healthy – Contributes tho their ability to communicate clearly and process information efficiently.

So, does salt heal everything? Maybe not, but it sure can ease a lot of common ailments and is an important element for maintaining balance in the body. Natural salt can be a great tool as long as you remember these key points: use naturally harvested pure salts, consume in moderation and consume with plenty of water. Whether it be in a bathtub for soaking, in a glass for drinking or to be drunken throughout the day to balance the salt in your meals plenty of water is always needed to balance the salt “in your tank”.

What do you think? Do you believe salt promotes healing or do you think it is bad for your health and contributes to problems like high blood pressure? I would love to hear your opinion in the comments section.

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Savory Granola

Savory granola is something you can use on yogurt for breakfast, sprinkled in salads for lunch or as a delicious snack. With only 2 tablespoons of raw honey this is the perfect granola for anyone trying to cut way back on sugar. With so much flavor packed in from all the nuts, seeds and spices you’ll never want to go back to sweet granola again.

Local spotlight:

For this recipe I used nuts and seeds from G.L. Alfieri Farms (Ripon, CA).

G.L. Alfieri Nuts

Health bennies:

  • Oats – High in fiber and protein.
  • Nuts – Great source of protein and healthy fat.
  • Pumpkin & sunflower seeds – High in important minerals such as phosphorus, magnesium and copper.
  • Sesame seeds – Great source of calcium, magnesium and other important minerals, contain lignans which can have a cholesterol-lowering effect.
  • Coriander, ginger, cardamom – Stimulates digestion, anti-inflammatory.
  • Cayenne – Stimulates digestion & blood circulation, antibacterial, dissolves congestion, helps you absorb nutrients from other foods.
Print

Savory Granola

Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

Servings 6 cup

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoon Raw honey
  • 4 cups Rolled Oats
  • 1/8 cup Pumpkin seeds
  • 1/8 cup Sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 cup Almonds raw, chopped
  • 1/4 cup Pistachios raw, shelled, chopped
  • 1/4 cup Pecans raw, chopped
  • 1/4 cup Cashews raw, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Sea Salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon Black pepper freshly ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon Coriander ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon Ginger ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cardamom ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
  • 2 tablespoons Sesame seeds raw

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 300 degrees.
  2. In a small pot melt the coconut oil and raw honey together over medium-low heat. About 5 minutes.
  3. In a large bowl combine the oats, nuts, pumpkin & sunflower seeds, salt, pepper, all of the spices and the coconut oil-honey mixture. Stir well.
  4. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper and spread the granola mixture on to it in an even layer.

  5. Bake for  1 hour, or until golden brown, giving the mixture a stir every 10 minutes or so.
  6. Let cool completely.
  7. Stir in the sesame seeds and store in airtight containers at room temperature.
  8. Granola will stay fresh for 3 weeks.

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut oil? Try this
Need Sea salt? Try this
Need Oats? Try these
Need Parchment Paper? Try this

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Homemade Coconut Peanut Butter

Coconut Peanut Butter

Ok, so I’m not gonna lie. You need some pretty heavy equipment to make this happen. But if you have these appliances already than you gotsta be making your own nut butter! It’s stupid easy, delicious and by making it yourself you know exactly what is in it.

So here is the equipment you need (don’t go running out to buy it if you don’t already have it, this is pricy stuff):

Health bennies:

  • Coconut manna (pureed coconut) – High in lauric acid, fiber & protein.
  • Peanuts – High in monounsaturated (good) fat. Great source of protein, vitamin E and antioxidants.

Here’s the recipe. You can make it with any kind of nut you please, almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, etc.  I love this stuff, I have it on toast a few times a week or just eat a strait up spoonful if I’m in the mood…

Print

Homemade Coconut Peanut Butter

*Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Peanuts roasted & salted (or raw)
  • 1/2 cup Coconut Manna

Instructions

  1. Run peanuts through your champion juicer using the blank screen (see juicer operating instructions).
    Coconut Peanut Butter Step 1
  2. Place peanut butter and coconut manna in food processor and process until smooth.
    Coconut Peanut Butter Step 2
  3. Transfer to a glass jar with a lid and refrigerate. Will stay fresh for weeks.
    Coconut Peanut Butter Step 3

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut Manna? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Indian Dahl and Rice

Indian dahl and rice

This is a delicious dish that fires up the digestive system, is great for the immune system and is very cleansing.   Feel free to swap out chard for any other kind of dark leafy green you like and to completely omit the tofu if desired.

Health bennies –

Herbs & spices – Good for the immune system, circulation and digestion. Anti-inflammatory, detoxifying, anti-microbial.

Dahl & brown rice – Complete protein, alkalinizing, good source of calcium, b vitamins, iron, vitamin E, amino acids &  linoleic acid. High in fiber, good for digestion, balances blood sugar.

Print

Indian Dahl & Rice

*Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Brown rice rinsed well
  • 2 cups Water
  • 1 Tablespoon Coconut oil cold pressed, unrefined
  • 1 each Carrot small dice
  • 1/2 each Yellow onion small dice
  • 2 ribs Celery small dice
  • 1 clove Garlic minced
  • 1/2 in. Ginger minced
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon Cardamom ground
  • 1 teaspoon Turmeric dried
  • 1 teaspoon Mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon Ceylon Cinnamon , ground
  • 1 teaspoon Cumin ground
  • 1 teaspoon Paprika
  • 1/8 teaspoon Nutmeg ground
  • 1 cup Mung dahl rinsed well
  • 1  - 14 oz. can Coconut milk unsweetened
  • 1 - 14 oz. can Whole peeled tomatoes blended into a puree
  • 1 bunch Chard stems removed & chopped
  • 1 cup firm Tofu large dice
  • TT S&P
  • 1/2 each Lemon
  • Handful fresh mint & cilantro leaves

Instructions

  1. Fill a small pot with 2 cups water and bring to a boil, add the rice, stir once, season with a pinch of salt and when it comes back up to a boil, reduce heat to low and cook covered for 45 minutes. Turn off heat let sit covered another 10 minutes. Fluff rice with a fork.
  2. While the rice is cooking cook the dahl. In a large pot melt the coconut oil and add the carrot, onion & celery. Cook over medium heat until they start to soften.
  3. Add the garlic, ginger, bay leaves and spices. Sauté 2 minutes.
  4. Add the mung dahl, coconut milk and tomato puree. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook about 45 minutes or until the dahl is tender.
  5. Add the chard to the pot, stir and wilt down.
  6. Fold in the diced tofu, season with S&P. and a squeeze of lemon juice.
  7. Serve over brown rice and garnish with fresh mint and cilantro.

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut oil? Try this!
Need Ceylon Cinnamon? Try this!
Need Mung dahl? Try this!
Need Tofu? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Matcha-mint chip shake

matcha-mint chip shake

matcha-mint chip shake

When I was a kid I LOVED mint chip ice-cream. Now a days I veer more toward strait up chocolate but the taste and smell of mint with chocolate still gets me nostalgic.

This shake makes a great afternoon pick me up. It’s also very cooling at the same time which I think makes a great balance.

Matcha is one of those ingredients making headlines on every health blog right now. It’s being used in smoothies, desserts, healthy snacks and of course as a tea. It has a wonderfully fresh grassy taste, which when paired with the mint in this shake tastes really refreshing.

Health bennies:

Matcha – High in antioxidants, boosts your immune system and increases energy.

 

Print

Matcha-mint chip shake

*Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Coconut milk unsweetened
  • 1 teaspoon Matcha powder
  • 1/2 cup Fresh mint leaves
  • 2 Tablespoons Cocoa nibs
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon Vitamineral green (optional)
  • pinch of sea salt
  • TT Stevia (optional sweetener, I personally leave it out)
  • 1 cup ice

Instructions

  1. Blend all ingredients in blender. Drink immediately.

Recipe Notes

Need Matcha powder?  Try this!
Need Cocoa nibs? Try this!
Need Vitamineral green? Try this!
Need Stevia? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Turmeric-black pepper tonic

Turmeric-black pepper tonic
Turmeric-black pepper tonic
Turmeric-black pepper tonic

If there ever was a powerhouse for boosting your immune system this is it.

Lets start with turmeric. Actually, lets start with curcumin, a polyphenol of turmeric. Studies show curcumin has very high anti-inflammatory properties, prevents pre-mature aging, improves memory loss, has anti-oxidant anti-cancer properties, helps manage arthritis and improves digestion therefore supporting a healthy immune system. The only downfall of this super substance, however,  is that when taken alone it has poor bioavailability (absorption). That means most of the nutrients in turmeric you ingest end up not being utilized.

Which leads me to  black pepper. Black  pepper contains piperine which is a bioavailability (absorption) enhancer. That means it helps other substances’s nutrients to absorb into your cells for a longer period of time.

Turmeric and black pepper, when taken together, make each others nutrients more bioavailable (absorbable).

That being said the supporting roles in this tonic are some pretty heavy hitters themselves.

Ginger is also an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory immune system booster.

As is raw honey.

Coconut water is high in potassium, vitamin C and electrolytes which is extremely hydrating. It is also an anti-oxidant, good for digestion immune system lover.

Lemon juice is high in vitamin C and cleanses the liver which is great for what? You guessed it.

Sea salt (like pink himalayan or grey celtic) contain 84 important minerals, it helps regulate blood pressure (contrary to popular belief) and most importantly for this cocktail is it assists with the delivery of nutrients into your body’s cells.

Boom.

Need I say more? Ok then, here’s the recipe. Drink up!

 

Print

Turmeric-black pepper tonic

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 1

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Coconut water (from young coconuts, non-pasteurized, non-concentrated and with no preservatives)
  • 1/2 teaspoon Turmeric
  • 1/2 in. Fresh Ginger peeled & chopped
  • 1/2 a Lemon juice only
  • 1/8 teaspoon Sea salt
  • 3 grinds of Fresh black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons Raw honey

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend for 30 seconds.

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut water? Try this!
Need Sea salt? Try this!
Need Raw honey? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Coconut-chia pudding with cocoa nibs, pomegranate and mint

Chia pudding

Chia pudding

Chia seeds used to be these things that you soaked in water, spread on a garden gnome and a few days later it grew a beard. Then we come to find out these things are actually incredibly good for you and we started putting them in our smoothies and sprinkling them on our salads. Then people started to figure out that when you soak them they turn to jelly like consistency and expand and therefore can be used as a thickener. Enter chia pudding. A wonderful dish invented by God knows who. I started messing around with this stuff about 9 months ago and discovered there are so many ways you can go with a good basic chia pudding recipe. Below I have my basic recipe that I have added cacao nibs to. If you don’t eat cacao nibs feel free to omit them. I used pomegranate and mint to garnish but feel free to use whatever you like. Nuts, seeds, any type of fruit, fresh herbs and spices are all great options. This dish can be eaten at breakfast, as a snack or as a healthy dessert.

Health bennies:

Chia Seeds – Extremely rich in fiber, omega-3s and anti-oxidants, a complete protein, high in nutrients but low in calories. Chia seeds absorb liquid, which for your body means they makes you feel full and are very hydrating.

 

Print

Coconut-chia pudding with cocoa nibs, pomegranate and mint

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 can 13.6 oz Coconut milk unsweetened
  • 5 Tablespoons Chia seeds
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla extract
  • TT Kosher salt (use himalayan pink or celtic grey to benefit from their minerals)
  • 2 Tablespoons Raw honey
  • 2 Tablespoons Cacoa nibs

Garnish:

  • 1 Tablespoon Cacoa nibs
  • 1/4 cup Pomegranate seeds
  • 2 sprigs Mint chopped

Instructions

  1. Whisk all ingredients together in a bowl. Pour into serving cups and refrigerate overnight.
  2. To serve garnish the cups of chia pudding with more cocoa nibs, pomegranate seeds and mint.

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut milk?  Try this!
Need Chia seeds? Try this!
Need Vanilla extract? Try this!
Need himalayan pink? Try this!
Need Cacoa nibs? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Awesome acai bowls

classic acai bowl

Acai (pronounce it ah-sigh-ee) is the fruit of a palm tree native to the Brazilian amazon. Once a staple of the indigenous amazon tribes, now a favorite amongst surfers, hippies and foodies. Here in the U.S. you can find it in the freezer section, already pureed and packaged in individual portions. There are usually two types available, unsweetened and sweetened with guarana, another plant native to the amazon, used for its potent amount of caffeine.

Acai bowls are most commonly made by pureeing acai with milk and other fruits. They are basically really thick smoothies, plated in a bowl and then garnished with whatever ingredients your heart desires. The sky really is the limit with this popular breakfast dish. They are an excellent way to get powdered superfoods into your breakfast like maca, spiralina and cacao or your daily dose of fiber by adding ingredients like chia seeds, granola or ground flaxseed. Pack in some protein by garnishing with nuts and seeds and kick up the antioxidant level with cacao nibs and berries. I like to keep bananas, mango or berries in my freezer at all times to blend up with the acai.

Health bennies:

Acai is high in antioxidants, vitamins A, B & K, fiber, potassium, omega fatty acids and is an anti-inflammatory,

Here are three acai bowls I like to make at home. Garnishes change depending on what I have in my pantry & fridge.

The Classic Acai Bowlclassic acai bowl

classic acai bowl
Print

The Classic Acai Bowl

Servings 1

Ingredients

  • 1 pack Sambazon Acai puree unsweetened (200g)
  • 1/4 cup Coconut milk organic
  • 1/2 each Banana frozen or fresh, organic
  • 1/2 teaspoon Maca powder
  • 1/2 cup Strawberries organic

Garnishes:

  • - strawberries sliced
  • - blueberries
  • -granola
  • - raw honey
  • -chia seeds
  • - bee pollen made from local bees, can be purchased at your local farmers market or health foods store
  • -hemp seeds
  • -goji berries

Instructions

  1. - In a high speed blender puree the acai, coconut milk, banana, maca powder and strawberries until smooth.
  2. - Pour puree into a bowl, sprinkle the garnishes on top and serve immediately.

Recipe Notes

Need Sambazon Acai puree, unsweetened (200g)? Try this!
Need Maca powder? Try this!
Need granola? Try this!
Need chia seeds? Try this!
Need hemp seeds? Try this!
Need goji berries? Try this!

The Chocolate Lover’s Acai bowlchocolate lover's acai bowl

chocolate lover's acai bowl
Print

The Chocolate Lover's Acai bowl

Servings 1

Ingredients

  • 1 pack Sambazon Acai puree unsweetened (200g)
  • 1/4 cup + 2 Tablespoons Almond milk
  • 1/2 each Avocado organic
  • 1 each Banana frozen or fresh, organic
  • 1 teaspoon Cacao powder
  • 1 teaspoon Ground flaxseed organic
  • 1 Tablespoon raw honey

Garnishes:

  • -cacao nibs
  • - almonds chopped
  • - blueberries
  • - coconut shredded, unsweetened
  • - sunflower seeds
  • -chia seeds

Instructions

  1. -  In a high speed blender puree the acai, almond milk, avocado, banana, cacao powder, ground flaxseed and honey until smooth.
  2. - Pour puree into a bowl, sprinkle the garnishes on top and serve immediately.

Recipe Notes

Need Sambazon Acai puree, unsweetened (200g)? Try this!
Need Almond milk? Try this!
Need Cacao powder? Try this!
Need Ground flaxseed? Try this!
Need cacao nibs? Try this!
Need chia seeds? Try this!

Tropical Acai Bowl

tropical acai bowl

tropical acai bowl
Print

Tropical Acai Bowl

Servings 1

Ingredients

  • 1 pack Sambazon Acai puree unsweetened (200g)
  • 1/4 cup + 2 Tablespoons Coconut milk organic
  • 1/2 each Banana frozen or fresh, organic
  • 1/2 cup Mango frozen or fresh, organic
  • juice from half  a lime

Garnishes:

  • - mango diced
  • - pineapple diced
  • - banana sliced
  • - avocado sliced
  • - coconut shredded, unsweetened

Instructions

  1. - In a high speed blender puree the acai, coconut milk, banana, mango and lime juice until smooth.
  2. - Pour puree into a bowl, sprinkle the garnishes on top and serve immediately.

Recipe Notes

Need Sambazon Acai puree, unsweetened (200g)? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.