Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

Iced Coconut Chai Golden Milk
Iced Coconut Chai Golden Milk
Photo by: Ketino Photography

Since moving to Hawaii I crave iced drinks now more than ever. Golden milk was something I really got into right before leaving San Francisco and I’ve always been a chai tea junkie. In this recipe I took the best of both worlds combined them with thick coconut milk and threw the whole concoction over ice. Pure bliss on a hot day.

Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk
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Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

A great shortcut for this recipe is to buy an already pre-blended chai spice. I also like to use cashew milk in this recipe but almond, soy or regular cow's milk will work too. Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Cuisine Dairy free
Servings 2 cups

Ingredients

Chai Spice Infusion

  • 15 grams Cardamom seeds
  • 10 grams Star Anise whole
  • 8 grams Coriander seeds
  • 1 each Cinnamon stick
  • 5 grams Cloves whole
  • 5 grams Black Peppercorns whole
  • 1 gram Nutmeg ground
  • 1 gram Allspice whole

Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

  • 2 cups Chai Spice Infusion
  • 1/2 cup Coconut Milk unsweetened
  • 1/2 cups Cashew Milk
  • 1/2 inch Piece of ginger peeled and smashed
  • 1 inch Piece of fresh turmeric peeled and smashed
  • 1 teaspoon Raw honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt

Instructions

Chai Spice Infusion

  1. Lightly crush all spices with a mortar and pestle or with the back of a sauté pan.
  2. Place the spices and 2 1/2 cups water in a pot and bring to a boil. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes.
  3. Strain and use for golden milk. (This recipe will make the exact amount of infusion you will need for the golden milk.)

Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

  1. Gently warm the chai spice infusion, coconut milk, cashew milk, ginger and turmeric in a pot. Do not boil.
  2. When hot, pour into a blender with the honey, vanilla and salt and blend until smooth.
  3. Pour over ice and serve immediately.

Recipe Notes

Want to make your own cashew milk? Here's my recipe.
Want to use a pre-blended chai mix? Try the Chai Traditions Blend by Wild Foods

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Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Tea For Digestion

Tea for digestion

What if you could ensure optimal digestion at every meal? No bloating, no heartburn, no abdominal pain and increased nutrient absorption.

There are many factors that are involved in digesting a meal well. Portion size, thoroughly chewing your food, the way you are sitting, how fast you are eating, etc.

But what if I told you that the drink that accompanies your meal also plays a huge role in how you digest it?

Hot vs. Cold. In Ayurveda, the 5000 year old North Indian science of life, they believe if you consume cold beverages you weaken the “digestive fire” that energizes your digestive system inhibiting you to get properly nourished from food. On the other hand drinking hot or warm beverages stoke this fire and stimulates digestion.

To drink or not to drink? You could also argue that drinking too much fluid wether it be hot or cold will over-dilute stomach acid and impair digestion as well. Because of this many believe you shouldn’t drink anything at all during a meal.

Drinking before a meal. Drinking water a half hour before a meal has been said to aid in digestion and even help with weight loss. By giving you a sense of fullness before you even start eating, drinking the glass of water before the meal may make you less likely to overeat.

Spiced teas are another way to go and my personal favorite. Something as basic as steeping fresh ginger in hot water to drink with your meal is one of the oldest and most common ways to stoke that “digestive fire”. The recipe I have designed below is sort of a combination of three different teas I like to make myself. They all benefit digestion so combining them made sense to me. It also tastes great.

Health bennies:

  • Ginger – warming, stimulates enzymes in the saliva which helps break down our food, improves circulation, increases energy, clears congestion.
  • Turmeric – warming, anti-inflammatory.
  • Black pepper – helps activate the curcumin in the turmeric which is responsible for turmeric’s anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Cumin, coriander & fennel seeds – good source of minerals and magnesium, helps prevent acid indigestion.
  • Fresh lemon – helps to detoxify the liver.
  • Raw honey – good for your immune system, high in antioxidants.

I know what you are thinking right now….but, I love ice water, an ice cold beer or chilled wine with my dinner. If you are in that category I invite you to notice how you feel at the end of a meal that you accompany an ice cold drink with. Then have a meal either drinking a warm beverage like ginger tea or nothing at all and compare it to the other meal. You may find no difference at all. You may see a dramatic difference. And if you do, you can choose to incorporate this practice into your daily routine as just one more thing you do to improve your health.

Do you have a preferred beverage to drink with meals? Why is this drink your go to? Do you love the flavor? Does it make you feel good? Does it cool you down or warm you up?

I would love to hear from you.

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Tea For Digestion

Servings 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Filtered water
  • 1 - 1 in. piece Ginger peeled and grated (about 1 teaspoon)
  • 1 - 1 in. piece Turmeric peeled and grated (about 1 teaspoon) or  (1/2 teaspoon powdered turmeric)
  • 1/8 teaspoon about 6-8 each  Black peppercorns, crushed
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cumin seeds crushed
  • 1/4 teaspoon Coriander seeds crushed
  • 1/4 teaspoon Fennel seeds crushed
  • 1/2 Lemon I love using Meyer lemons for this, but a regular lemon also works great
  • 2 teaspoons Raw honey

Instructions

  1. Combine the water, ginger, turmeric and dried spices in a small pot and bring to a boil over high heat.
  2. Reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer 10 minutes.
  3. Remove from the heat, strain and stir in the juice of half a lemon and the honey.
  4. Enjoy while the tea is still warm on its own or with a meal to stoke your digestive fire.

Grated turmeric

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Spring Cleanse Bone Broth

Bone broth

Spring is the best time of the year to do a cleanse and move stagnant winter energy out of your body. It’s a time to push out toxins and built up congestion and start fresh.

Drinking a cup of bone broth every day during or after a cleanse acts as a supplement to help maintain good health, keep us strong and heal the gut.

As an added bonus for the liver I have added some herbs to this broth that aid in detoxification – milk thistle and Astragalus (a chinese herb often referred to as huang qi).

Source your veal bones from a reputable butcher. Try to find organic, hormone and antibiotic free bones.

Health bennies:

  • Veal knuckle and femur bones – High in collagen and cartilage (more so than beef bones) which help rejuvenate skin, hair, nails, cells and tissue. Heals the intestinal lining by feeding the gut cells. Helps balance the immune system. Replenishes important vitamins and minerals, Contains all 9 essential amino acids needed for optimal health. Helps liver detox heavy metals. Strengthens bones and improves joint health.
  • Milk Thistle – Often used in Chinese medicine to detox the liver.
  • Astragalus – Known in Chinese medicine to be a Qi (chi) mover which helps move stagnant energy out and promote new tissue growth.
  • Garlic & Ginger – Good for your immune and digestive systems, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory.
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Spring Cleanse Bone Broth

Servings 1 Gallon

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds Veal knuckle bones
  • 3 pounds Veal femur bones with marrow
  • 1 teaspoon Sea Salt
  • 1 Tablespoon Black peppercorns crushed
  • 1/2 cup Apple cider vinegar distilled, white or red can also be used
  • 6 quarts Water filtered
  • 2 Yellow onion large dice
  • 2 Carrots large dice
  • 4 ribs Celery large die
  • 1 bunch Thyme
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • 1/4 cup Milk Thistle Seeds
  • 1/4 cup Astragula Huang qi
  • 1/2 bunch Parsley
  • 3 inch piece Ginger peeled and sliced
  • 6 cloves Garlic smashed

Instructions

  1. Place the first 6 ingredients into either 1 very large stockpot or 2, 1-gal pots divided equally. Let sit at room temp for 1 hour so that the vinegar and sea salt can draw the minerals out of the bones.
  2. Bring the pot (or pots) up to  barely a boil over medium heat, reduce heat to a simmer.  Skim off impurities, cover partially and simmer on low for 2 days. Add more water as often as needed in order to keep the bones covered, always returning the broth to a simmer.
  3. On the 3rd day add the next 10 ingredients and continue to simmer another 6 hours, adding more water if necessary to keep everything covered.

    Broth
  4. Strain the broth through a fine mesh sieve. Keep any collagen, marrow or meat that falls off the bones, chop them finely and add them to the strained stock.
  5. Divide the broth into 8 – 1 pint mason jars with lids. Freeze what ever you are not going to drink within one week.

Recipe Notes

Need Milk Thistle Seeds? Try this!
Need Astragula (Huang qi)? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Natto Miso

Nattoh Miso

Natto miso is a sweet, chunky, chutney like miso. Not to be confused with Natto,  pungent smelling and gooey soybeans fermented with the bacillus stills bacteria. Natto miso takes it’s name from natto because of the similarity in appearance, both containing whole soybeans, but is much more approachable for most westerners.

Natto miso is made by fermenting a mixture of cooked soybeans, barley miso (koji), barley malt, kombu, ginger & sea salt (or shoyu). It’s delicious used as a condiment for rice, tofu, vegetables & meats or used as a spread on rice crackers. It should not be cooked as that would kill all of it’s beneficial bacteria.

Health bennies – High in probiotics which are very good for digestion and therefore strengthen your immune system. The addition of kombu here gives you an added boost in calcium, antioxidants and other essential vitamins & minerals. Ginger is also very good for digestion.

Locally you can find natto miso in the bulk section at Rainbow Grocery

You can also Buy natto miso online

If you would like to make your own I suggest buying the book The Art of Fermentation

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Turmeric Roasted Cauliflower And Potatoes

Turmeric roasted cauliflower and potatoes

turmeric roasted cauliflower and potatoes

Bust open your spice cabinet and try out this turmeric roasted cauliflower and potato recipe. It is my jam right now!

Ok, so there is a lot of spices to work with here and you may have to take a trip to the grocery store to load up. But it’s worth it because once you make this tasty dish you will want to make it every week.

Swap out broccoli, root vegetables or mushrooms to keep things interesting. And don’t skimp on the lemon.

Health bennies:

Turmeric, black pepper, ginger, cardamom & fennel seed – Reduces inflammation, eases arthritic pain and upset stomach, is an antioxidant, aids in digestion and boosts the immune system.

Cayenne – Helps your body assimilate nutrients.

Cauliflower – Anti-inflammatory, detoxifying, high in the cancer fighting properties sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, high in fiber and vitamin C and great for digestion.

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Turmeric Roasted Cauliflower And Potatoes

Servings 6

Ingredients

  • 1 head Cauliflower cut into florets
  • 5 each Very small yukon gold potatoes cut in quarters
  • 3 cloves Garlic smashed
  • 5 sprigs Thyme chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons Avocado oil or another high heat oil, save your olive oil for salad dressings
  • 3/4 teaspoon Turmeric powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon Cardamom seeds ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon Fennel seeds ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon Dried ginger
  • pinch of cayenne
  • TT Sea salt and black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons Parsley chopped
  • 1/2 each Lemon

Instructions

  1. - Pre-heat your oven 400 degrees. In a large bowl toss the cauliflower, potatoes, garlic, thyme, oil, spices, salt and pepper together and spread on to a sheet pan lined with parchment paper, roast 10 min.
  2. - Increase your oven temperature to 425 degrees, give the vegetables a stir and continue roasting another 20 minutes or until they are tender and golden brown.
  3. - Remove from the oven, squeeze a half a lemon over the top, sprinkle with fresh chopped parsley, give it another stir and serve.s

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.