Celebrating Hawaii’s Emerging Meat Industry – Forage Hawaii Farm To Table Dinner | November 2017

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography

Last weekend I joined forces with Forage Hawaii in hosting our first farm to table dinner on Oahu.

I met Jessica Rohr, owner of Forage Hawaii, taking regular trips to the Kaka’ako farmers market where she distributes local meats every week. Jess and I hit it off right away, both of us being so passionate about cooking and supporting local. When the day finally came, that it dawned on us we should work together, the wheels started spinning and plans to host a dinner event celebrating local farmers and ranchers were made.

After going on a farm tour of Mari’s Gardens in Mililani one afternoon it was settled, we found our venue and this thing was going down.

Don’t rain on my parade

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography

The rain dumped all day. And then stopped right before the guests showed up. Just in time for a tour of Mari’s Gardens, the biggest hydroponic and aquaponic farm in Hawaii. Guests got to learn all about their organic, sustainable farming practices and see the very impressive variety of lettuces, microgreens, edible flowers, fruits, vegetables and fish farmed on property.

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography

Knocking it out

A behind the scenes look at the hours leading up to dinner…

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography

Ingredient driven

An exceptional meal starts with exceptional ingredients. 50% of the produce used was from Mari’s Gardens including: ulu, Meyer lemons, limes, Negi onions, watermelon and Cheriette radishes, watercress, edible flowers and a variety of herbs and microgreens. The other 50% of the produce was sourced from other small farms on island. All of the meats used were locally sourced from: 2Lady farmers, Maui Nui Venison and Makaweli Meat Company.

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography

Showtime

After Jess and I kicked off dinner and the food started flowing we had the privilege to hear from some of the key players responsible for the pushing Hawaii’s local meat scene forward: Patsy Oshiro and Stacy Sugai from 2Lady Farmers and Kimo Tuyay from Maui Nui Venison.

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography

The pork course

Patsy and Stacy told us the story of how 2Lady farmers came to be, thanking the Shinatos from Shinato Farm for their mentorship and helping them get their small pig farm off the ground. They likened their farming style to  Mothers raising their children stating that they really care for their animals like family. Their intentions are to take what they have learned from the Shinsatos and pay it forward, offering mentoring programs to future farmers here on Oahu.

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography

The venison course

Kimo taught us about wild venison. We learned how it is not only delicious but more sustainable to harvest and healthier to eat. He announced a couple of new projects on the horizon including a new line of Maui Nui Venison jerky hitting the market in January and the Kahikinui project, where they will be harvesting another local wild, population – wild cows. After the event Kimo said in regards to 2Lady farmers, “it was interesting to hear the same sentiments they had towards the pigs they raise as the wild deer we harvest, which is less stress equals better product.”

I think everyone was able to take away something important from all of the speakers and reaffirm to themselves why it is so important to continue to support local, non-factory farms.

Unfortunately, we didn’t get many photos of our guests of honor but I think that their beautiful cuts of meat speak for themselves.

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography
Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Photo by: Ketino Photography

The response to our first dinner was heartwarming. It showed that there are a number of people here on Oahu who truly support the farm to table movement and appreciate the people who are providing nutritious and sustainably grown food to this island. It just goes to show that by voting with your forks you can be a part of something that is ethical, pro-health and help to create change in your community and environment.

There’s no “I” in team

Our team did an amazing job and worked tirelessly all day to ensure the event was a true success. Huge thanks to Spencer, Lauren, Annie, Ardus, Ikaika, Jacey, our photographers Rob and Ketino and Brendon and Tanya from Mari’s Gardens. We could of never pulled this off without you.

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
The team. Photo by: Ketino Photography

Stay tuned for the next Forage Hawaii vs. Healthy Locavore farm to table dinner…

Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner
Boss ladies. Photo by: Ketino Photography

For updates on when the next Forage Hawaii farm to table dinner will be and about all other Healthy Locavore events subscribe to the weekly Healthy Locavore newsletter here.

Mahalo nui loa to everyone who attended. See you next year!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Osprey, Your Local Seafood Market

Osprey local seafood market
Osprey local seafood market
Osprey Seafood in Napa, CA

Where is your local seafood market? Have no idea? Chances are if you are a seafood lover and a home cook you may have struggled with this problem before.

There doesn’t seem to be any shortage of butcher shops, farmers markets or health food stores these days but even here in San Francisco I find it very difficult to shop for seafood.

Outside of dining in a high end seafood restaurant or purchasing seafood wholesale (the perks of being a professional chef) there really isn’t many local seafood market options in the bay area.

Last month I wrote about my favorite fishmonger in the bay area, Mike Winberg-Lynn. He is my number one trusted source here locally.

His market, Osprey Seafood, in Napa has an amazing selection and is amongst the freshest you can find around here.

What’s great about Mike is he’s been in the business a long time so he has good relationships with the fisherman and really knows his product.

I spoke with him recently regarding a few issues consumers struggle with when buying seafood. Here are his tips on how to become more confidant when selecting seafood….

Farm-raised vs. wild fish

I asked Mike what his opinion was on farm-raised fish. His take on this topic was simply this, “there is not enough wild fish in the world to feed everybody.”

He says “the argument with farmed fish has always been about the practices. The cleanliness, antibiotics, the amount of wild fish needed in order to feed farmed fish, fish swimming in their own shit. These practices took place in the 90s. The industry has evolved since then. They aren’t perfect but they are learning and their practices today are tons better than they were 10 years ago. Right now the ratio that they have to feed is 1-1. That’s 1 pound of wild fish to grow 1 pound of farmed fish. That’s even better than what it is in the wild. I visited a farm in Canada where the tidal flow was so strong and constant that I thought, there’s no way these fish could be swimming in their own shit.”

Although Mike agrees that wild fish is always the best option he admits that in places like the U.S., Norway, Scotland, Canada and Scandinavia they are producing respectable farm raised fish. He warns to stay away from fish farmed in South America where giving fish antibiotics isn’t regulated.

Basically when it comes down to it, if you took away farmed fishing it would tax the wild fisheries way too hard.

Which fish are sustainable to eat.

As you may recall from our last article together, Mike hate’s the word sustainable.

But to answer my question he said, “The United States is deemed sustainable, if you buy domestically or from New Zealand and Australia you can feel good about what you are buying”.

He says, “Every single domestic fishery has a managing group looking at everything it has found. (this is why domestic fisheries are so good). They count the catch to see how much volume they are bringing in so they can know when they have hit a maximum. Last year they were catching a lot of squid and the government stepped in and said that’s enough.

There’s no way to know how much fish is really out there. We can’t count them all, we have methods of maybe counting them but other than salmon, which we have a really good method of finding out how many are out there, we have no clue. Sometimes fish disappear because the water is too warm (like in the case of el nino). If you move 2 or 3 degrees your gonna lose a whole eco system.”

Mike says to stay away from buying fish caught in China and Japan who don’t always follow the rules.  And besides shrimp he avoids buying seafood from the gulf of Mexico because of frequent algae blooms due to high heat.

Seafood species found locally in the bay area.

Mike says that around summer and fall you can find rock fish, salmon, ling cod, petrale sole, sand dabs, mackerel and anchovies. Salmon season closes in October.

In March they hold hearings and decide when they are going to open salmon season and which salmon fisheries may be in danger. He explained that, “Salmon live their life in the ocean 5 years, give or take. At the end of that time period they go back up the river they came from to spawn. Certain populations of salmon will decrease. Right now the stress point where we are is the sacramento run. We try to stay away from all the sacramento river fish. As they started their migration back to the river we shut down areas to avoid fishing them. That was in July, no fishing in July because we want to make sure these salmon make it back to the river.

Sardines, anchovies and squid only show up during certain times, so sometimes you might get lucky and sometimes you may not. 

Most fish are seasonal meaning we get them just when they appear, like black cod. Its been a great year for black cod, but you will soon see that start to disappear. Albacore, same thing. We see them in the summer and that’s great but then by October they’re gone. But with El Nino everything flips. This year we didn’t hardly see any white sea bass.

Crab season starts mid November and lasts until early summer. There are times when the demonic acid levels are too high and they have to shut down crab season. This year it’s looking good.”

What to look for when purchasing seafood.

Mike thinks that in the bay area we do a pretty good job in general of offering good quality seafood. He says, “In the bay area the demand of quality is high. If you walk into a store and it smells like fish walk out. If it smells a little bit like fish give them a break it is fish. If it smells rank or overly bleachy walk away.”

Additionally, I would also say to look for clear eyes, firm skin and flesh and a nice vibrant color.

Local seafood markets Mike recommends. 

Mike says, “Besides Osprey Seafood in Napa I recommend, Monterey Fish Market in Berkeley, Hapuku Fish Shop inside Market Hall in Oakland,  Antonelli Bros in San Francisco  and even Whole Foods does a decent job. Programs like CSFs (community supported fisheries) are good. They will give you good fish. I don’t know if you want to eat as much sardines as they want to give you but they are usually using hook and line local fish.” An example of one of these would be Real Good Fish.

Favorite seafood restaurants in the bay area.

I asked Mike, when he goes out to dinner where are some of his favorite restaurants in the bay area for seafood. He said,Perbacco, Staffan (the chef/owner) knows more than any chef I have ever worked with, his knowledge of seafood and food in general is incredible, Gotts roadside, who is one of our accounts, their quality is very good, Swan Oyster Depot really knows their fish, Coqueta, Bottega, Hurley’s (just about any restaurant in Napa, really), Wood Tavern and Walnut Creek Yacht Club

Why I buy from Mike.

As I said before, I trust Mike over anyone else when purchasing seafood. I purchased fish from him wholesale when I was a chef in the restaurant business and I continue to purchase from him for my private chef clients and personal use.

Besides knowing the fish business inside and out Mike is a friend. He has a wonderful wife and family and has a wonderfully silly sense of humor.

Want to see just how knowledgeable and funny Mike is? Check out his educational video on oysters here. I laughed my ass off.

My favorite quote from Mike is this, “I had a fellow fishmonger say that when he retires he will be buying his fish from me. The reason is that we know quality and I love fish. My idea of a perfect day is to work with fish. I hate business. I am a poor business man, but I love working with fish. My brother Pat is better at the computer than me.”  Whenever I read that it makes me smile.

So where is your local seafood market? It’s time to get out there and take a look around. Help out the little guy. Support your community. And in doing so, support your own health and the health of the environment.

I would love to hear your opinion in the comments section below.

I also would love to invite you to subscribe to The Healthy Locavore, for my weekly newsletter. I am so grateful for this community, thank you for being part of it!

Mike and Susan
Mike and his lovely wife Susan

Mike and his lovely wife SusanAs a physiological psychology graduate from UCSB, Mike looked forward to a professional future in the laboratories of the Bay Area. Newly married and with high hopes, he moved his family to the Haight Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco only to find a hiring freeze up and down the peninsula. After several months of selling wedding presents to make rent, his life took one of those turns. Upon a chance meeting with a neighbor who owned the fish store across the street, Mike begged for any job at all. The neighbor, Peter Bird, hired Mike as a driver for $5 per hour. It was September of 1983 and Mike fell in love with the business from the very start. As he learned the day-to-day operations, his passion for fish and the people who worked with it grew. In December of 1986, Mike excitingly took the plunge and purchased a major share in Osprey Seafood. By 1989, Mike invested all he had in Osprey Seafood and became the sole owner. Since then, Mike’s goal to serve the entire Napa Valley area has resulted in the retail store at Wine Country Avenue. 29 years later and he still loves fish.

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Is Boycotting Hawaii’s Fishing Industry for Forced Labor Allegations Sustainable?

If you hadn’t heard, Hawaii was in some hot water last month. Allegations of allowing forced labor and poor working conditions for foreign crew members on longline fishing boats were all over the internet and consumers were in an uproar.

But is shutting them out and writing them off for what they did sustainable?

Show of hands, whose tired of hearing the word sustainable being thrown around like dirty socks when it comes to fish? There is probably nobody else I know who is sicker of it than my long time friend and trusted fishmonger, Mike Weinberg-Lynn, owner of Osprey Seafood.

Sustainability has become a buzzword among foodies, in markets like Whole Foods and in the news for a long time now. It’s what the “responsible” people are talking about.

But what happens when one of the biggest fisheries in the world, known for using the most sustainable fishing practices around, gets busted for allegations of human slavery?

There was nobody I trusted more to get the facts from than Mike.

But before we get down and dirty on what went down in Hawaii I would like to tell you a love story.

Neurologist turns fishmonger

Once upon a time in the Haight-Ashbury there was an intelligent man with a degree in neurology who married the love of his life.

As with many newlyweds the young couple had a baby on the way and was struggling to make ends meet. Work at the time in Mike’s field was scarce. Wedding gifts were reluctantly sold in order to pay rent.

Enter Peter Bird. Picture a man with long bushy red hair and an even bushier red beard knocking on your door on Haight street asking if he can crawl through your window. Mike’s first reaction was um, no and as he went to close the door in the man’s face Peter called out “wait I’m your neighbor and I’ve locked myself out of my apartment!”

As Mike allowed the bearded man to crawl out his though his window, in order to get in through his own, Mike shouted “hey what do you do for a living anyway?” in which Peter replied, “I own the fish market across the street!”

A light bulb in Mike’s head went off. He asked Peter for a job and just like that Mike’s career as a fishmonger was born.

Happily ever after

It was 1984. After a year of slangin’ fish together Peter realized how much of an asset Mike had become to him and his business. He was reliable, dedicated and unlike him and the rest of the staff actually came to work sober. Mike was so dedicated in fact that he turned down a career at Genentech, something he had worked so hard for all those years in college, in order to keep delivering fish for Peter. Looking back on it now he realizes he would have been retired 20 years ago if he’d of taken that job.

But Mike was a new Dad, the hours he worked at the fish market allowed him to spend his afternoons with his family and on top of that he was absolutely loving the fish biz. Peter offered him a partnership and over 30 years later, Mike still owns and operates Osprey Seafood to this day.

How Osprey Seafood made its mark

Osprey got on the map when they started selling scallops to a high profile restaurant in the Napa Valley. Peter was one of the first fishmongers back then to ship freshly caught fish from the east coast overnight to San Francisco. The French chefs loved him. They were blown away by the quality of their monkfish and scallops, just to name a couple and told all of their fellow chefs about it. After making a name for themselves in Napa it didn’t take long for Chefs in San Francisco to take notice. More and more accounts got added and Osprey Seafood became one of the most trusted names in the seafood business.

What’s really been going down in Hawaii these last few years?

Mike’s first knee-jerk reaction when I asked him about Hawaii’s recent fishing boat slavery scandal was “Those assholes! We aren’t buying any fish from Hawaii until they work this out.”

He hopped on the phone right away with his contact over at the Honolulu fish auction to find out what was going on over there. Unaware of the situation and not realizing the magnitude of it Mike’s buddy laughed it off in which Mike replied sternly, “you better look into this because this is not going to play out well”.

By the next day Mike had answers.

It turned out, due to legislation that had been passed in Hawaii, through a loop hole Hawaiian longline fishing boats technically had the right to employ undocumented foreign workers on their boats and because they did not have work visas they were not protected under U.S. labor laws. These workers had signed contracts and were being paid more than what they could make in their own countries.

What Hawaii had on their hands were a few longline fishing boats that would not allow their crew off the boat for 2-3 years because they could not legally be on Hawaiian land. The pay sucked, the working hours were ridiculously long and living conditions were rough. The reality is they were being abused.

Why you probably shouldn’t boycott in times like these.

As Mike had more time to sit back and digest this new information he started to look at the bigger picture.

Hawaii was and is one of the leaders known for their fishing techniques and sustainable practices, he thought. They did not need a mark on their record like this.

As he recalled there had been times in the past when campaigns such as “say no to swordfish” and “dolphin free tuna” brought more bad than good to the fishing industry.

He said that back in the 80’s when people stopped buying tuna to try and save the dolphins it had a tremendous impact on the gulf of Mexico’s fishing industry which has led to it’s downward spiral ever since.

Because of the campaign the fisherman went bankrupt and had to sell their boats.

As time passed and people “forgot” about the boycott they started buying tuna again only now there weren’t enough boats in the gulf to keep up with the demand.

Immigrants from Vietnam showed up to take advantage of the opportunity fishing tuna would have to offer. But unlike the original fisherman who had passed down important information from generation to generation they did not know the fishing cycles, about patterns, about what size the tuna should be when caught and where the spawning grounds were. They fished without knowledge and in doing so they depleted the gulf.

Mike said, “if people boycott buying fish from Hawaii all of these people are going to go out of business and these are the people who are doing it the right way.”

Is there even such thing as sustainable anymore?

When asked to touch on what sustainability in the fishing industry meant to him Mike answered, “I hate the word sustainable. It has no meaning anymore. Dump the term sustainable and start talking about responsible fishing practices. Stop buying crap from countries that we know are not playing the game and following the rules like China and Japan. Buy domestic or from New Zealand and Australia if you want to support sustainability. Places like Hawaii have the boats that are fishing responsibly.”

Hawaii handles business

Since the articles on forced labor went flying around the internet and the Hawaii Seafood Council started their investigation there has been some major changes.

The first thing they did was form a task force who evaluated all labor practices on all Hawaiian longline fishing boats.

They immediately implemented a system of checks and balances that would protect the foreign crews from further forced labor and abuse and improve working conditions.

A new standardized contract has been written and distributed to crew members in their own native languages.

Large retail and wholesale seafood companies were informed of the new criteria for responsible labor practices so that they could feel good about selling their products again.

The Honolulu fish auction, where these boats deliver and sell their catch, warned that any boats “that are unable to prove that forced labor is not being used” would be denied auction services. A zero tolerance policy has now been put into place.

Additionally the Hawaii Seafood Council promises to offer continued outreach and education for the Hawaii longline fishing boats on this subject of forced labor.

As stated in the Hawaii Seafood Council’s press release: “This fishery has proven itself over the years to be responsive and an industry leader in meeting the challenges arising from new information about fishery impacts on fish populations and protected species. The allegations of labor abuses present a serious and new challenge, and the industry is rallying to respond quickly. I am confident that through this process we will ferret out any vessel from the fleet that is involved in forced labor, labor abuse or substandard working conditions and treatment of the crew.” says John Kaneko, Task Force member and Program Director of the Hawaii Seafood Council.

The decision is up to you.

Was what the owners of these boats did morally wrong? Yes. Did the industry take it seriously. Yes. Did they take every action possible to right their wrongs. Yes.

In the end it comes down to this for me, Hawaii is dedicated to producing a high quality product in a way that is safe and sustainable for the environment.

Nobody’s perfect but I think if you learn from your mistakes you deserve a second chance, especially with a track record like Hawaii’s.

What will you do? Will you stop buying fish from Hawaii to stand up for what these crew members went through or will you support a fishery that at the end of the day produces some of the most sustainable seafood in the world?

I would love to hear your opinion in the comments section below.

I also would love to invite you to subscribe to The Healthy Locavore, for my weekly newsletter. I am so grateful for this community, thank you for being part of it!

Mike and Susan
Mike and his lovely wife Susan

 

Osprey seafood has a retail shop, open to the public, located at 1014 Wine Country ave. Napa, CA 94558. It is also one of the major seafood wholesalers in the bay area supplying restaurants such as Perbacco, Coqueta and Swan Oyster Depot.

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Seared Sardines with Potatoes and Celery-Herb Salad

Nowhere do I hear the word sustainability mentioned more often than when it comes to the topic of seafood. It is no secret that we are depleting our ocean. According to Paul Greenberg in his TED talk, The four fish we’re overeating and what to eat instead,  the majority of Americans stick to these four fish: tuna, salmon, cod and shrimp. The overfishing of these fish put them  on the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch as ones to avoid yet we eat them anyway. Why? Because most Americans think fish is “gross”.

Unless I am talking to fellow chefs or foodies I usually get a scrunched up face of disgust looking back at me when I  mention the word sardines.

Sardines are one of my favorite fish. They have an incredible flavor, are high in omega-3 fatty acids and are, for most of the year, sustainable to fish.

There’s a catch with sardines however. They can be hard to find, they have a very short shelf life and (here’s the part where you scrunch your face up) you have to rip their guts out. To me that is part of the adventure of eating sardines though! It’s a special occasion when I serve up a plate of sardines for Spencer and I at home. It means, I scored and found some Monterey Bay sardines today, I have the time to prepare them and we are getting a treat tonight!

Below is my favorite preparation for sardines. You may never make this but my hope is that maybe the next time you see sardines on a menu it inspires you to order them or at the very least stop all that nose scrunching.

If you are interested in learning more about which fish are the most sustainable to be eating right now check out the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Guide and be a part of the solution, not the problem.

Chef tip: Look for wild Pacific Sardines from the U.S. or Canada. Cook them within the first 2 days you buy them.

Print

Seared Sardines with Potatoes and Celery-Herb Salad

Use organic ingredients whenever possible

Servings 2

Ingredients

  • 1 each Fingerling potato sliced into coins
  • 1 rib Celery sliced
  • 4 sprigs Parsley leaves only
  • 2 sprigs Dill chopped
  • 1/2 a Lemon
  • EVOO
  • Sea Salt & fresh ground black pepper
  • 4 each Fresh Sardines scaled, gutted, head and tail removed - Ask your fishmonger to do this for you or watch the how-to video linked in the recipe notes below
  • Aleppo pepper optional
  • Cast iron skillet or other heavy bottom pan

Instructions

  1. Place the sliced fingerling potatoes in a small pot, cover with cold water and add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook until tender about 10 minutes or so. Strain, toss the potatoes in EVOO and set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the celery, parsley leaves, dill, a squeeze of lemon, a drizzle of EVOO and salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.
  3. Get a cast iron pan hot over high heat.
  4. Pat the prepared sardines on each side with a paper towel so that they are dry.
  5. Sprinkle a light layer of salt evenly in the bottom of the hot cast iron pan.
    Cast iron pan
  6. Place the sardines skin side down in the pan atop the salt (do not add any oil to the pan).
  7. While the sardines are searing on the skin side, season the flesh side with salt and pepper.
  8. After about 30 seconds flip the sardines over with a fish spatula and sear them on the other side about 30 seconds. You are looking for crispy golden brown skin and just barely cooked fish.
  9. Transfer the sardines to a paper towel with a fish spatula.
  10. Divide the fingerling potato coins on the bottom of two serving plates.
  11. Place two sardines on each plate over the potatoes.
  12. Squeeze fresh lemon juice over each sardine and top with the celery-herb salad.
  13. Sprinkle aleppo pepper evenly over each dish if desired for a subtle spicy smoky flavor.
  14. Enjoy with a glass of crisp, cold white wine!

Recipe Notes

Want to learn how to fillet a sardine? Watch this awesome how-to video!

Need Aleppo Pepper? Try this

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Grass-fed Beef vs. Conventional. What’s the dif?

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I’m going to start off by saying this. We should all eat less meat. Yep, there it is. Not only do our bodies function better on a primarily plant based diet but what we are doing to our environment with these massive animal prisons, oops I mean feedlots, is destroying our planet. That being said, I love meat (as you can tell from the photo of me above) but in order to be able to enjoy it fully I have some stipulations.

Let me first start by describing the way a pastured, grass-fed cow lives. They roam as they wish on sunny, grassy pastures eating the food their stomachs were meant to digest, which is grass not corn and soy. They are given no antibiotics, and no growth-promoting hormones.

Conventional cows live in CAFO’s (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations). They  stand in their own manure wedged in pens with all of the other sick cows.  They are fed a gruel of corn, soy,  grain, cotton byproducts and whatever other garbage is lying around (I’ve heard peanut shells, old candy and citrus pulp). Their stomachs cannot digest grain properly which is one of the reasons they are all sick and on antibiotics. They are given growth-promoting hormones so that they can hurry up and grow to slaughter size so we can ship them out by the masses to kill them for hamburger meat. I won’t even go into what happens at the slaughterhouses, that’s a whole other story in itself.

This is why this is F-ed up. Conventional cows that eat nutrient deficient food and  are given antibiotics and hormones leave us nutrient deficient, cause antibiotic-resistant bacteria in our guts and screw with our hormones by eating it. Because, simply put, you are what you eat. In conventional cows omega-3 fatty acids basically do not exist, which is a problem because the omega-6 fatty acids still do. This makes an already inflammatory food much more inflammatory because the omega-6s aren’t being balanced out with the omega-3s. Their milk is tarnished so we have to pasteurize it, which kills all the bad bacteria but also kills all of the good bacteria along with it, and again there’s no omega-3s and a lot less calcium. Not to mention you are giving your money to greedy, deceitful corporations which only feeds the health and environmental problems we have. Their flashy brand names have nothing to do with the breed of cow you are eating and their practices put small farmers out of business and bankrupt their families. Their USDA organic stickers speak of nothing to do with how the cows were raised, where they were raised or how humanely they were treated and slaughtered only that they ate organic feed and did not receive medications. Better than nothing you say? Sure, but I’m not hot on lining the pockets of hypocrite corporations that primarily produce conventional meat or processed junk food.

Why I eat pastured, grass-fed beef. It is more nutritious, the cows live better lives and they don’t receive antibiotics or hormones. Their fat is high in omega-3s which balance out the inflammation caused from the omega-6s, they are high in stearic acid (a saturated fat that does not create bad cholesterol), vitamins and minerals. They also have more collagen and lower amounts of saturated fat. They graze from pasture to pasture sinking more carbon into the soil, on natural feeding patterns which gives time for grass to re-grow. Small farms usually do not travel far to sell their meats using a lot less fossil fuels.

Where to find it. I’ll stop soapboxing now to talk about where you can get this sustainably raised, more nutritious beef. If you are local to the bay area I have some suggestions below. If you are not my suggestion to you is that you hop on the internet and start searching for local farms near you that raise pastured, grass-fed beef (and all other pastured animals for that matter). Ask around, go to your farmers market, meet the farmers. They are out there trust me it just takes a little digging, traveling and a little extra money sometimes. But again, if you are eating less meat, as we all should, you will be saving your time and money to treat yourself to the good stuff. After all you only need about 6 oz. of protein a day and there are plenty of other places to get that other than meat.

Butcher shops that rock in the bay area:

Marina Meats

Olivier’s Butchery

Avedano’s

Fatted Calf

Golden Gate Meat Co.

Farms that do it right in bay area:

Magruder Ranch

Mountain Ranch

Stemple Creek Ranch

Marin Sun Farms

Prather Ranch

Belcampo

Devil’s Gulch (does not raise cattle but is definitely still worth mentioning for all of it’s other animals raised – pigs, rabbits, lamb)

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.