Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

Iced Coconut Chai Golden Milk
Iced Coconut Chai Golden Milk
Photo by: Ketino Photography

Since moving to Hawaii I crave iced drinks now more than ever. Golden milk was something I really got into right before leaving San Francisco and I’ve always been a chai tea junkie. In this recipe I took the best of both worlds combined them with thick coconut milk and threw the whole concoction over ice. Pure bliss on a hot day.

Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk
Print

Iced Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

A great shortcut for this recipe is to buy an already pre-blended chai spice. I also like to use cashew milk in this recipe but almond, soy or regular cow's milk will work too. Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Cuisine Dairy free
Servings 2 cups

Ingredients

Chai Spice Infusion

  • 15 grams Cardamom seeds
  • 10 grams Star Anise whole
  • 8 grams Coriander seeds
  • 1 each Cinnamon stick
  • 5 grams Cloves whole
  • 5 grams Black Peppercorns whole
  • 1 gram Nutmeg ground
  • 1 gram Allspice whole

Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

  • 2 cups Chai Spice Infusion
  • 1/2 cup Coconut Milk unsweetened
  • 1/2 cups Cashew Milk
  • 1/2 inch Piece of ginger peeled and smashed
  • 1 inch Piece of fresh turmeric peeled and smashed
  • 1 teaspoon Raw honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt

Instructions

Chai Spice Infusion

  1. Lightly crush all spices with a mortar and pestle or with the back of a sauté pan.
  2. Place the spices and 2 1/2 cups water in a pot and bring to a boil. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes.
  3. Strain and use for golden milk. (This recipe will make the exact amount of infusion you will need for the golden milk.)

Coconut-Chai Golden Milk

  1. Gently warm the chai spice infusion, coconut milk, cashew milk, ginger and turmeric in a pot. Do not boil.
  2. When hot, pour into a blender with the honey, vanilla and salt and blend until smooth.
  3. Pour over ice and serve immediately.

Recipe Notes

Want to make your own cashew milk? Here's my recipe.
Want to use a pre-blended chai mix? Try the Chai Traditions Blend by Wild Foods

SaveSave

SaveSave

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Roasted Seaweed And Turmeric Popcorn

turmeric popcorn

turmeric popcorn

 

 

 

I’ve been getting inspiration for this salty snack all over the place lately. Food & Wine Magazine, 101 Cookbooks and The Poke Cookbook all have awesome versions of this wether it be seaweed or turmeric popcorn.

What makes mine different I guess is the hodgepodge of ingredients I have going on here. Popcorn, as we know, was first domesticated in Mexico, turmeric originates from India and seaweed can be found being consumed anywhere near a coastline. I also threw in some cashews, which are originally native to Brazil.

So why the con-fusion? Because it tastes good!

This tasty snack packs a nutrient punch and is an excellent substitution for chips or crackers.

Health bennies:

  • High in calcium
  • Good source of iron
  • Good source of omega-3s
  • High fiber
  • Antioxidant
turmeric popcorn
Print

Roasted Seaweed And Turmeric Popcorn

I like to use SeaSnax (link posted below recipe) for this mix because I find it to be crunchier and easier to crumble than most roasted nori seaweed I find. *Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Cuisine Gluten free
Servings 1 gallon

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Popcorn kernels non-gmo
  • 4 Tbsp Butter grass-fed
  • 3/4 tsp Shichimi Togarashi
  • 1/2 tsp Turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tsp Sea salt (I use pink Himalayan salt)
  • 2 Tbsp Furikake
  • 1 cup Cashews roasted and salted
  • 2 pkgs SeaSnax roasted seaweed (.18 oz packs)

Instructions

  1. Pop the popcorn in an air popper or stove top.
  2. Melt the butter and stir in the shichimi togarashi, turmeric, sea salt and furikake.
  3. In a large bowl toss together the popcorn, cashews and butter-spice mixture.
  4. Crumble the SeaSnax finely into the popcorn mixture and toss to combine.
  5. This snack mix will stay fresh for 2-3 days. After that the popcorn starts to become stale.

Recipe Notes

Need SeaSnax? Buy "SeaSnax Roasted Seaweed Grab and Go Packs"
Need Shichimi togarashi? Buy "Shichimi Togarashi - Japanese Mixed Chili Pepper"
Need Furikake? Buy "Nori Komi Furikake (Rice Seasoning)"

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

How To Make A Golden Milk Latte

golden milk latte
golden milk latte
Golden Milk Latte

Have a chai latte addiction? If, so you’re gonna love this. A golden milk latte is a spin on an Ayurvedic tonic that has been around thousands of years. Due to the rise in apothecary shop and high end tea lounge popularity its become a trendy new treat.

So what is golden milk? To answer that question you must start with golden turmeric, a spice blend consisting of turmeric, black pepper and ginger.

These spices create a delicious, warming drink that increases blood circulation, aids digestion and helps keep the immune system strong.

You have two options here. You could buy a pre-made blend such as, Moondeli, sold at Homestead Apothecary in Oakland. They flavor theirs with cardamom and pink Himalayan salt.

Moondeli golden turmeric
Moondeli Golden Turmeric
Homestead Apothecary
Homestead Apothecary

Or, you can make your own. Scroll down to the bottom of the page for my recipe. I liked the idea of using cardamom and pink Himalayan salt, so I too have added those to my recipe as well as ground cinnamon for some added sweetness.

Golden Turmeric
Golden Turmeric

Once you have your golden turmeric you can make golden milk. Again, you have a couple options here.

The first option is to buy a pre-made golden milk. The Living Apothecary, also based out of Oakland, makes a delicious vegan version using their house-made almond milk.

Living Apothecary
The Living Apothecary

They use local, organic almonds soaked over night to make their milk and then season it with California dates, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, all spice, clove, pink Himalayan salt and vanilla. This is a super high quality product that I highly recommend if you are not going the DIY route.

Simply warm the milk and either whisk or blend in a blender to make a frothy latte.

 

Living Apothecary
The Living Apothecary milks and kefirs

Making your own golden milk is simple too. Use a ratio of 1 teaspoon golden turmeric to 1 cup milk, of your desired choice, and whisk together well.

Now for the fun part. Want to make a golden milk latte from scratch? Here’s how…

golden milk latte
Print

Golden Milk Latte

I like to use cashew milk for my lattes for the creaminess and thickness. You can also use regular cow's milk, almond milk, coconut milk or any other milk of your choice. I also add coconut oil to the latte. That and the black pepper help your body absorb the curcumin in the turmeric more fully. Curcumin is the active compound in turmeric that is credited for giving it it's anti-inflammatory properties. As you can see here, I have first given you the ingredients to make your own golden turmeric. This batch makes a little over a half cup. That way you have extra leftover to use the next time you want to make a golden milk latte. If you opt out of making your own, skip this step and just use 1 teaspoon of pre-made golden turmeric for your latte. ***Use organic ingredients whenever possible
Cuisine Dairy free, Gluten free
Servings 1 serving

Ingredients

Golden Turmeric

  • 4 tbsp Dried Turmeric ground
  • 1 tsp Black pepper ground
  • 1 tbsp Dried Ginger ground
  • 2 tsp Pink Himalayan Salt
  • 1 tsp Cardamom seeds ground
  • 1 tsp Cinnamon ground

Golden Milk Latte

  • 1 cup Cashew Milk Home-made or store bought
  • 1 tsp Golden turmeric
  • 1 tsp Coconut oil
  • 1/4 tsp Vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp Raw honey

Instructions

Golden Turmeric

  1. Whisk all of the spices together well and store in an airtight container at room temperature. Use as needed.
    Golden Turmeric

Golden Milk Latte

  1. In a small pot heat the milk, golden turmeric and coconut oil until warm. Do not boil.
  2. Remove from the heat and whisk in the vanilla and honey. Whisk vigorously to make the drink frothy or blend in a blender for even more frothiness before serving.

Recipe Notes

Want to make your own cashew milk? Here's my recipe.
Want to buy pre-made golden turmeric? Buy it here.
Want to buy pre-made golden milk? Buy it here.

  • Disclaimer: The health benefits described here are for educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the food and drug administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Delicata Squash Roasted With Turmeric and Shichimi Togarashi

Delicata Squash Roasted with Turmeric

Delicata Squash Roasted with Turmeric

Delicata squash is the easiest squash to prep. Not to mention, Delicata squash roasted, is really quite tasty.

What makes this variety stand out from the rest is it’s delicate skin. Hence the name! You can chop it up, cook it and eat it without ever pulling out your peeler. The skin is totally edible.

And although all it really needs is salt and pepper to do the trick I like to spice it up with some turmeric and Shichimi Togarashi – a japanese spice blend made up of red chili pepper, sesame seeds, orange zest, ginger and seaweed to add a little zest to it. It goes really well with some steamed rice in my opinion.

Delicata Squash Roasted with Turmeric
Print

Delicata Squash Roasted With Turmeric and Shichimi Togarashi

Shichimi togarashi is spicy. If you don't care for spicy food omit it and try this recipe with sweet paprika instead.
Cuisine Dairy free, Gluten free
Servings 4 Servings

Ingredients

  • 1 each Delicata Squash about 1 pound, rinsed well
  • 1 Tablespoon Grapeseed oil or other high heat oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon Turmeric powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon Shichimi Togarashi
  • 1/2 teaspoon Sea salt
  • 6 grinds Black pepper
  • 6 Sprigs Cilantro chopped
  • 1/4 each Lime

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat oven 350 degrees.
  2. Slice squash in half lengthwise and remove the seeds.
    squash sliced in half lengthwise
  3. Slice each half in 1/2 inch moons.
    sliced squash
  4. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. Toss the squash with grapeseed oil, turmeric, Shichimi Togarashi, sea salt and black pepper.
    squash prep
  5. Roast the squash in the oven for about 20-25 minutes or until you can insert a knife easily into the squash. You are looking for tender, not mushy.
  6. Finish the squash with chopped cilantro and a squeeze of lime.

Recipe Notes

Need Grapeseed oil? -Buy "La Tourangelle, Grapeseed Oil"
Need Shichimi Togarashi? -Buy "Shichimi Togarashi - Japanese Mixed Chili Pepper"

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Tea For Digestion

Tea for digestion

What if you could ensure optimal digestion at every meal? No bloating, no heartburn, no abdominal pain and increased nutrient absorption.

There are many factors that are involved in digesting a meal well. Portion size, thoroughly chewing your food, the way you are sitting, how fast you are eating, etc.

But what if I told you that the drink that accompanies your meal also plays a huge role in how you digest it?

Hot vs. Cold. In Ayurveda, the 5000 year old North Indian science of life, they believe if you consume cold beverages you weaken the “digestive fire” that energizes your digestive system inhibiting you to get properly nourished from food. On the other hand drinking hot or warm beverages stoke this fire and stimulates digestion.

To drink or not to drink? You could also argue that drinking too much fluid wether it be hot or cold will over-dilute stomach acid and impair digestion as well. Because of this many believe you shouldn’t drink anything at all during a meal.

Drinking before a meal. Drinking water a half hour before a meal has been said to aid in digestion and even help with weight loss. By giving you a sense of fullness before you even start eating, drinking the glass of water before the meal may make you less likely to overeat.

Spiced teas are another way to go and my personal favorite. Something as basic as steeping fresh ginger in hot water to drink with your meal is one of the oldest and most common ways to stoke that “digestive fire”. The recipe I have designed below is sort of a combination of three different teas I like to make myself. They all benefit digestion so combining them made sense to me. It also tastes great.

Health bennies:

  • Ginger – warming, stimulates enzymes in the saliva which helps break down our food, improves circulation, increases energy, clears congestion.
  • Turmeric – warming, anti-inflammatory.
  • Black pepper – helps activate the curcumin in the turmeric which is responsible for turmeric’s anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Cumin, coriander & fennel seeds – good source of minerals and magnesium, helps prevent acid indigestion.
  • Fresh lemon – helps to detoxify the liver.
  • Raw honey – good for your immune system, high in antioxidants.

I know what you are thinking right now….but, I love ice water, an ice cold beer or chilled wine with my dinner. If you are in that category I invite you to notice how you feel at the end of a meal that you accompany an ice cold drink with. Then have a meal either drinking a warm beverage like ginger tea or nothing at all and compare it to the other meal. You may find no difference at all. You may see a dramatic difference. And if you do, you can choose to incorporate this practice into your daily routine as just one more thing you do to improve your health.

Do you have a preferred beverage to drink with meals? Why is this drink your go to? Do you love the flavor? Does it make you feel good? Does it cool you down or warm you up?

I would love to hear from you.

Print

Tea For Digestion

Servings 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Filtered water
  • 1 - 1 in. piece Ginger peeled and grated (about 1 teaspoon)
  • 1 - 1 in. piece Turmeric peeled and grated (about 1 teaspoon) or  (1/2 teaspoon powdered turmeric)
  • 1/8 teaspoon about 6-8 each  Black peppercorns, crushed
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cumin seeds crushed
  • 1/4 teaspoon Coriander seeds crushed
  • 1/4 teaspoon Fennel seeds crushed
  • 1/2 Lemon I love using Meyer lemons for this, but a regular lemon also works great
  • 2 teaspoons Raw honey

Instructions

  1. Combine the water, ginger, turmeric and dried spices in a small pot and bring to a boil over high heat.
  2. Reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer 10 minutes.
  3. Remove from the heat, strain and stir in the juice of half a lemon and the honey.
  4. Enjoy while the tea is still warm on its own or with a meal to stoke your digestive fire.

Grated turmeric

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Turmeric Daikon Pickles

Daikon pickles

I went out to dinner recently in the east bay and was inspired by a plate of pickles set in front of me at the beginning of the meal. Their offering included four different vegetables, all different colored and flavored with various spices. All of them were excellent but the one that jumped off the plate for me was the turmeric pickled daikon. It was crunchy, vibrant,  pungent and highly addictive. Being my predictable curious self,  I then had to go home and make my own.

These pickles are naturally fermented which brings on a whole slew of health benefits for your digestive system.

Health bennies:

  • High in probiotics
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Detoxifying
  • High in vitamin C
  • Contain enzymes that help your body break down starches
Print

Turmeric Daikon Pickles

Servings 1 quart

Ingredients

  • 1 each Daikon about 1 pound, peeled, split in half lengthwise and sliced 1/4 inch thick
  • 1 clove Garlic smashed
  • 1 Tablespoon Ginger minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon Turmeric ground
  • 1 teaspoon Korean chili flakes or regular chili flakes
  • 2 Tablespoons Sea salt
  • 1 quart Filtered water
  • 1 each Grape leaf can be out of a jar

Instructions

Equipment needed:

  1. 1 quart Mason jar
  2. Cheesecloth
  3. or thin linen napkin
  4. 1 Rubber band

Directions:

  1. Mix the daikon, garlic, ginger, turmeric, chili flake and salt together in a bowl.
  2. Pack the mixture into the mason jar, add the grape leaf and cover completely with filtered water.
  3. Cover the jar with cheesecloth and secure with a rubber band.
  4. Let sit on the counter for 7 days then transfer to the fridge.

Recipe Notes

Need Korean chili flakes? Try this!
Need Grape leaf? Try this!
Need Cheesecloth? Try this!

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Turmeric-black pepper tonic

Turmeric-black pepper tonic
Turmeric-black pepper tonic
Turmeric-black pepper tonic

If there ever was a powerhouse for boosting your immune system this is it.

Lets start with turmeric. Actually, lets start with curcumin, a polyphenol of turmeric. Studies show curcumin has very high anti-inflammatory properties, prevents pre-mature aging, improves memory loss, has anti-oxidant anti-cancer properties, helps manage arthritis and improves digestion therefore supporting a healthy immune system. The only downfall of this super substance, however,  is that when taken alone it has poor bioavailability (absorption). That means most of the nutrients in turmeric you ingest end up not being utilized.

Which leads me to  black pepper. Black  pepper contains piperine which is a bioavailability (absorption) enhancer. That means it helps other substances’s nutrients to absorb into your cells for a longer period of time.

Turmeric and black pepper, when taken together, make each others nutrients more bioavailable (absorbable).

That being said the supporting roles in this tonic are some pretty heavy hitters themselves.

Ginger is also an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory immune system booster.

As is raw honey.

Coconut water is high in potassium, vitamin C and electrolytes which is extremely hydrating. It is also an anti-oxidant, good for digestion immune system lover.

Lemon juice is high in vitamin C and cleanses the liver which is great for what? You guessed it.

Sea salt (like pink himalayan or grey celtic) contain 84 important minerals, it helps regulate blood pressure (contrary to popular belief) and most importantly for this cocktail is it assists with the delivery of nutrients into your body’s cells.

Boom.

Need I say more? Ok then, here’s the recipe. Drink up!

 

Print

Turmeric-black pepper tonic

**Use organic ingredients whenever possible.
Servings 1

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Coconut water (from young coconuts, non-pasteurized, non-concentrated and with no preservatives)
  • 1/2 teaspoon Turmeric
  • 1/2 in. Fresh Ginger peeled & chopped
  • 1/2 a Lemon juice only
  • 1/8 teaspoon Sea salt
  • 3 grinds of Fresh black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons Raw honey

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend for 30 seconds.

Recipe Notes

Need Coconut water? Try this!
Need Sea salt? Try this!
Need Raw honey? Try this!

 

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.

Turmeric Roasted Cauliflower And Potatoes

Turmeric roasted cauliflower and potatoes

turmeric roasted cauliflower and potatoes

Bust open your spice cabinet and try out this turmeric roasted cauliflower and potato recipe. It is my jam right now!

Ok, so there is a lot of spices to work with here and you may have to take a trip to the grocery store to load up. But it’s worth it because once you make this tasty dish you will want to make it every week.

Swap out broccoli, root vegetables or mushrooms to keep things interesting. And don’t skimp on the lemon.

Health bennies:

Turmeric, black pepper, ginger, cardamom & fennel seed – Reduces inflammation, eases arthritic pain and upset stomach, is an antioxidant, aids in digestion and boosts the immune system.

Cayenne – Helps your body assimilate nutrients.

Cauliflower – Anti-inflammatory, detoxifying, high in the cancer fighting properties sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, high in fiber and vitamin C and great for digestion.

Print

Turmeric Roasted Cauliflower And Potatoes

Servings 6

Ingredients

  • 1 head Cauliflower cut into florets
  • 5 each Very small yukon gold potatoes cut in quarters
  • 3 cloves Garlic smashed
  • 5 sprigs Thyme chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons Avocado oil or another high heat oil, save your olive oil for salad dressings
  • 3/4 teaspoon Turmeric powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon Cardamom seeds ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon Fennel seeds ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon Dried ginger
  • pinch of cayenne
  • TT Sea salt and black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons Parsley chopped
  • 1/2 each Lemon

Instructions

  1. - Pre-heat your oven 400 degrees. In a large bowl toss the cauliflower, potatoes, garlic, thyme, oil, spices, salt and pepper together and spread on to a sheet pan lined with parchment paper, roast 10 min.
  2. - Increase your oven temperature to 425 degrees, give the vegetables a stir and continue roasting another 20 minutes or until they are tender and golden brown.
  3. - Remove from the oven, squeeze a half a lemon over the top, sprinkle with fresh chopped parsley, give it another stir and serve.s

Sarah Burchard is the author of The Healthy Locavore, a natural foods chef and certified health coach whose writing centers around holistic health, supporting community and eating locally grown and made food.